Bottles of Roundup herbicide, a product of Monsanto, are displayed on a store shelf in St. Louis, on June 28, 2011. Health Canada scientists say there is no reason to believe the scientific evidence they used to approve continued use of glyphosate in weed killers was tainted. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Jeff Roberson

Health Canada upholds decision to keep glyphosate products on the market

Health Canada is upholding its 2017 decision that weed killers and pesticides containing glyphosate were safe

Health Canada scientists say there is no reason to believe the scientific evidence they used to approve the continued use of glyphosate in weed killers was tainted.

The department’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency is upholding its 2017 decision that weed killers and pesticides containing glyphosate were safe as long as they are properly used and labelled.

However eight objections were filed about the decision accusing Monsanto, maker of the glyphosate-based weed killer Roundup, of filing scientific studies supporting their product without revealing the company had a hand in those studies.

READ MORE: B.C. forest ministry cutting back on use of herbicide glyphosate

Their accusations were based on documents filed in a U.S. lawsuit in which a former groundskeeper was awarded a multimillion-dollar settlement after jurors decided his cancer was linked to glyphosate.

Bayer Ag, which owns Monsanto, denies improperly influencing the outcomes of hundreds of studies it says prove its product is safe.

READ MORE: B.C. health care payroll tax approved

In a decision released today Health Canada scientists say a thorough review did not produce doubt or concern regarding the science used to decide glyphosate can continue to be used in Canada and that no pesticide regulatory authority in the world currently considers glyphosate to be a cancer risk at current exposure levels.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Contempt charge against Balfour logging protesters dropped on technicality

A B.C. Supreme Court justice ruled Cooper Creek Cedar failed to file a contempt application

Developer offers details for former Kerr Apartment site

Wayne Woodward is planning a five-storey building on Victoria Street

Jail time for driver involved in Castlegar road rampage

Sean Patrick Byrne caused havoc on Castlegar roads in November

UPDATED: Meth possession charges considered after car rolls off Nelson highway

Vehicle landed beside the Rosemont pedestrian trail

Kootenay Lake’s first marine waste pump-out opens

Sewage facility is located at the Prestige marina

Disney Plus to launch in Canada in November

Analysts say latest streaming service may escalate cord cutting

B.C. manhunt suspects left cellphone video before they died: family

Family member says Kam McLeod, Bryer Schmegelsky recorded final wishes

Okanagan bus driver assaulted for asking patron not to smoke

59-year-old in hospital with non-life threatening injuries

B.C. sets rules for ride hailing, same minimum fee as taxis

Larger operating areas seen as threat by cab companies

Two hiking families team up to extinguish fire in B.C. backcountry

Children and their parents worked for three hours to ensure safety of the popular hiking region

Vancouver man arrested after pregnant woman’s SUV stolen, then crashed

Police are recommending charges against a 22-year-old Vancouver man

Elections Canada to assess ‘partisan’ climate change rhetoric case by case

People’s Party of Canada Leader Maxime Bernier has said climate change is not an emergency nor caused by human

Unseasonable snow forces campers out of northeastern B.C. provincial park

Storm brought as much as 35 centimetres of snow to the Fort Nelson, Muncho Lake Park-Stone Mountain Park

Most Read