ICBC claims to move out of courtroom as of April 1

The reforms take effect on Monday, in addition a new injury cap on pain and suffering payouts

British Columbians injured in a car crash will no longer pursue settlements in the courtroom, starting April 1.

The government reminds the public disputes will be handled by the Civil Rights Tribunal for claims valued at $50,000 or under.

The tribunal will liaise a victim’s case without the need for a lawyer. It will help determine whether an injury is considered minor, as well as the accident benefits and where responsibility falls when an ICBC settlement offer is disputed.

The tribunal already resolves strata and other small claims issues.

The NDP government expects the move to save ICBC more than $1 billion a year, in addition to a new injury cap of $5,500 on pain and suffering payouts. The average payout is roughly $30,000 per case.

The insurance corporation anticipated a $1.18-billion loss for the most recent fiscal year. The full tally is not yet known.

READ MORE: ICBC shifts to Alberta model, with higher rates, private insurers say

READ MORE: Would-be drivers caught cheating on ICBC licence test


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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