IH says no cases of bacterial meningitis confirmed

Some concern as a few Kimberley students presented with meningitis-like symptoms

Just the word meningitis can cause a great deal of alarm to parents, and Kimberley parents were concerned when they were notified by Selkirk Secondary this week that two students had been seen at East Kootenay Regional Hospital for symptoms associated with meningitis.

Parents were told that nothing had been confirmed but if your child has symptoms, you should consult your doctor or go to the Emergency Room for treatment.

Dr. Karin Goodison, medical health office with Interior Health confirmed that the agency is aware of recent concerns about reports of meningitis cases in Kimberley, but wants to reassure everyone that there are no confirmed cases of bacterial meningitis.

“While we cannot speak about individual patients, we can say that we have no confirmed cases of bacterial meningitis at this time,” Goodison said. “Further testing may be done on individual patients to look for other organisms, such as viruses, that may also cause meningitis symptoms.

“We recognize that the mention of meningitis has caused concern for parents, students, the school and the community, and Interior Health is closely monitoring this situation.

“At this time, we do not have concerns about a risk to the broader student or general population.”

Interior Health advises that covering coughs and sneezes, and good handwashing are important in the prevention of all viral and bacterial illnesses.

There are two main types of meningitis:

Viral meningitis is fairly common. It usually doesn’t cause serious illness. In severe cases, it can cause prolonged fever and seizures. Most people with viral meningitis usually start getting better within three days of feeling sick, and they recover within two weeks.

Bacterial meningitis isn’t as common, but can be very serious. It needs to be treated right away to prevent possible brain damage and death.

Meningitis may be spread from person to person by coughing, sneezing, or close contact.

The most common symptoms of meningitis among teens and young adults are:

• A stiff and painful neck, especially when you try to touch your chin to your chest.

• Fever.

• Headache.

• Vomiting.

• Trouble staying awake.

• Seizures.

Anyone with concerns should contact their family physician or visit the nearest emergency department.

More information is available at the https://www.healthlinkbc.ca/health-topics/aa34518

Just Posted

Nelson CARES to buy Hall-Front development for affordable housing

A $4.5-million investment from the provincial government has been committed to the deal

Aimee Watson elected RDCK chair

The representative for North Kootenay Lake took over this week

Glacier Gymnastics to add multi-purpose room

The expanded space will help accommodate the popular after-school programming

Woman searching for father last seen in Nelson in 1999

Frank Johnson’s daughter, Chandra Machin, is searching for her father

Winter weather hits parts of Canada

As some parts of the country brace for cold, parts of B.C. remain warmer than 10 C

B.C. teacher’s Amazing Race takes students on Canada-wide adventure

Agassiz high school students say they had the experience of a life time

Don’t sign USMCA until LGBTQ language excised, U.S. lawmakers urge Trump

The trade agreement, forged after 13 months of tense negotiations between Canada and the U.S. is scheduled for Nov. 30

US official: US intel says prince ordered Khashoggi killing

Vice-President Mike Pence told reporters that ‘the murder of Jamal Khashoggi was an atrocity.’

Canada’s health system commendable overall but barriers to care remain: UN

The United Nations says Canada’s health care system is “commendable” overall but vulnerable groups still face barriers to quality care.

Unique technology gives children with special needs more independent play

UVic’s CanAssist refined seven prototypes aided by $1.5M government contribution

Kelly Ellard’s boyfriend has statutory release revoked

Darwin Duane Dorozan had several parole infractions that found him ‘unmanageable’

Doctor’s note shouldn’t be required to prove you’re sick: poll

70% of Canadians oppose allowing employers to make you get a sick note

Most Read