With the wet June now behind us

June brings wet weather, in July sun shines

For the fourth straight year, the amount of precipitation recorded during June was greater than normal.

For the fourth straight year, the amount of precipitation recorded during June was greater than normal.

According to Ron Lakeman in weather services at the Southease Fire Centre in Castlegar a main rain event from the night of June 18 to June 20 brought 62.5 millimetres of rain.

On one day, June 19, rainfall measured 46.0 mm.

“This was the greatest amount of rain we ever encountered in one day in the month of June,” Lakeman says.

The previous greatest one-day June rainfall was 44.2 mm from 1986.

During the week following the main rain event, waves of Pacific moisture spiraled northeastward from coastal Oregon-Washington for further showers and relatively cool temperatures. Another 16 millimetres of rain fell during the night of June 24.

The 105.4 millimetres of rain this month was 160 per cent of the normal June rainfall but less than half the record maximum amount of 227.7 millimetres received during June 2012.

“We’re less than half of what we got last year,” says Lakeman. “It’s still far in excess of what the normal is … if you put it in comparison, June of 2013 was downright dry. But in reality it was still was a wet month, just not as wet as the extreme we had last June.”

The weather man describes the weather as uneventful in the first half of the month with “a flat ridge of high pressure producing several sunny, warm days while weak disturbances allowed for unsettled conditions with generally light showers and thundershowers at times.”

Lakeman reports the monthly mean temperature at only slightly warmer than normal — by 0.5 degrees.

“The average high temperature was almost bang on normal and the average overnight low was about a degree milder,” he said.

A high of 32.2 degrees was recorded on June 30 and the low occurred on June 3 at 6.2 degrees. The record high was recorded in 2008 and was 37.9 degrees. The record low was 1.6 degrees.

The final few days of the month were still unsettled at times but with a large upper ridge of high pressure building from the south much warmer temperatures also developed.

Now into July without a major rainy season, Lakeman says we could still expect some unsettled weather bringing moisture along with the heat.

“In June, it is far more common to get a lot of rain,” he says. “Of the summer months, June is the wettest by far.”

July is commonly drier than June with August and September being the driest months of the year.

 

Just Posted

Nelson honours veterans 100 years after end of WWI

Several hundred people gathered at the cenotaph on Sunday

B.C. Legions in need of young members to continue aiding veterans into the future

Lest we forget what thousands of men and women did to fight for Canada’s freedoms – but without new membership, many Legion chapters face dwindling numbers

Nine-vehicle pileup closes Highway 3 near Castlegar

Two separate incidents on slushy highway; reports of injuries

UPDATE: Police seek witnesses in Castlegar road rampage

Lake Country man faces 13 charges, including robbery, dangerous driving, flight from police, assault with a weapon, theft, and drug charges.

RDCK removes conditions from Kalesnikoff office project

Kalesnikoff says it is still planning to move ahead with new office building project

VIDEO: Marvel Comics’ Stan Lee dies

Marvel co-creator was well-known for making cameo appearances in superhero movies

VIDEO: Newcomer kids see first Canadian snowfall

Children arrived in Canada with their mother and two siblings last week from Eritrea

Calgary 2026 leader expects close vote in Winter Games plebiscite

Residents to choose in a non-binding vote on Tuesday whether they want city to bid on 2026 Olympics

Feds dropped ball with WWI anniversary tributes: historians

Wrote one historian: ‘Other than the Vimy Ridge celebration … I think they have done a very bad job’

Sides ‘far apart’ in Canada Post talks despite mediation, says union

The lack of a breakthrough means rotating strikes will resume Tuesday

Feds’ appeal of solitary confinement decision in B.C. to be heard

Judge ruled in January that indefinite such confinement is unconstitutional, causes permanent harm

B.C. health care payroll tax approved, takes effect Jan. 1

Employers calculating cost, including property taxes increases

Nunavut urges new plan to deal with too many polar bears

Territory recommends a proposal that contradicts much of conventional scientific thinking

Shelter struggles: Landlord takes over rental unit whenever visiting B.C. town

Renter’s story highlights how hard it is to find accommodation in Revelstoke

Most Read