The main pool at Ainsworth Hot Springs.

Lower Kootenay Band purchasing Ainsworth Hot Springs Resort

Ainsworth acquisition an important economic development and historical investment for First Nation in Creston Valley...

The Lower Kootenay Indian Band (LKB) is purchasing Ainsworth Hot Springs Resort, Chief Jason Louie announced yesterday.

The acquisition, which will see ownership change hands in April, is an important economic development investment for his people, and it has historical significance too, he said.

“The Lower Kootenay Band has a history with the site that dates back hundreds of years,” he said. “The Ainsworth Hot Springs are known by the Ktunaxa people as ‘nupika wu’u’, which has a literal translation meaning ‘spirit water’.”

The resort, located 22 kilometres south of Kaslo on Kootenay Lake, has been family-owned since 1962. Current owners Norm and Joyce Mackie purchased the property from Joyce’s parents, Sam and Belle Homen, in 1979.

No immediate changes are planned for the resort, Louie said. He and band representatives met with resort staff on Wednesday to announce that all employees would be kept on. The resort currently provides about 50 jobs in the management and operation of the hot springs, 41-room hotel and restaurant.

“The resort will provide meaningful employment and business opportunities for the citizens of Yaqan Nukiy and local residents, and will continue to be a major tourism destination of the region,” he said.

LKB will be investing in capital improvements at the resort in the near future.

“We are privileged and pleased to enter into this purchase agreement with Chief Jason Louie and the Lower Kootenay Band,” Norm and Joyce said in a written statement. “The resort has been a family affair since 1962 and transferring ownership is a daunting experience.

“This has been a wonderful 35-year ride for our family. Probably the best part for us has been to watch young people, in their first job, come to work with us, and become self-assured contributors to the work force. Many of these people come back to visit and tell us this was probably the best job they ever had. This is truly gratifying.”

One of the goals for the new owners is to work closely with Ainsworth area residents and to continue to build relationships to strengthen the area’s tourist economy, Louie said.

“The spirit water has been medicine for healing various ailments that the human body experiences,” he said. “This business venture reconnects our First Nation to a significant cultural site of the Ktunaxa people.

“The Lower Kootenay Band will continue to strive for excellence in hospitality and experience. Professional development will be ongoing and customer service will remain a priority.”

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