Danica Day is growing alfalfa seeds as part of a school project.

Move over, Hot Dog Day

South Nelson’s healthy eating initiative has youngsters chowing down on local greens.

South Nelson Grade 2 student Danica Day is cultivating alfalfa seeds in a small plastic cup lined with paper towel, along with her entire class. Someday soon she hopes to sprinkle them on her salad.

“First we had a paper towel, and we put our finger in to push it to the bottom. These are the seeds, and then it’s going to grow into alfalfa,” Day told the Star, during a healthy eating presentation from her teacher Daphne Van Alstine. “I’m pretty excited to put it on my salad.”

And if you’re surprised to hear a youngster speak enthusiastically about eating greens, get used to it: the school’s weekly salad bar program is going strong.

“I was hired by the South Nelson parent advisory council to prepare the salad bar on a weekly basis,” parent Janine Pierson said. “It was originally inspired by a Farm to School grant, but now it runs on its own as a regular school program.”

Salad ingredients are sourced from local farmers and businesses, including the Uphill Bakery, which delivers fresh bread in its bright orange electric vehicle.

“When your food is really fresh, it tastes so much better. And if you’re part of growing it you can understand how things in season taste best. I think this will inspire a lot more healthy eating.”

Pierson’s own children are more inclined to take certain ingredients at school than they are at the dinner table, because they’re taking their cues from enthusiastic peers.

“It’s good to branch out and go beyond Hot Dog Day,” principal Kim Jones said. “I remember my Mom coming into Hot Dog Day and it was great fun but there were zero health benefits. It was all about fundraising.”

That’s not how Salad Day works, she said.

“Now we’ve got fresh food, a parent volunteer, and we’re connecting these kids with local farmers.”

The entire project was made possible by program coordinator Louise Poole last year. Van Alstine was effusive about how the weekly salad bar developed, and how much her students have embraced it.

“It’s a wonderful smorgasbord of a variety of lettuce, veggies, seeds, and other toppings,” she said. “Next month we will be growing greens and maybe some radishes. This all ties into an awareness of how plants grow, what parts of plants we eat, healthy choices and the joy of watching something grow.”

And the kids love it.

When asked why she considers learning how to grow her own food an important skill to have, Day was succinct: “Because then I’m going to have something to eat.”

 

Just Posted

Kootenay Co-op Radio calls for support to avoid deficit

The annual funding drive is important to the station’s financial health

DATELINE 1969: Narcotics seminar hears call for drug law reform

Greg Scott digs into the Nelson Daily News archives

Motion calls on Rossland city council to recognize ‘climate crisis’

Andy Morel wants to raise awareness of urgent need for action by higher levels of government

Police investigating man’s death in Winlaw

Foul play not established, but major crimes unit is investigating

CHECK THIS OUT: Enquiring minds want to know

Anne DeGrace writes about the diverse reasons people use the library

New airline regulations bring compensation for tarmac delays, over-bookings

Some of the new regulations will roll out in July, while others are expected for December.

Kootenay man arrested and charged in 2015 murder

Nathaniel Jessup 32 of Creston has been charged with the second-degree murder of Katherine McAdam and offering an indignity to a body.

Scheer says it would take Conservatives five years to balance budget

Scheeraccused the Liberal government of spending $79.5 billion of previously unbudgeted funds

B.C. man, 30, arrested for driving his parents’ cars while impaired twice in one day

The Vancouver-area man was arrested after officers caught him driving impaired twice in one day

GALLERY: First responders in Fernie return baby owl to its nest

The baby owl’s inability to fly back to its nest prompted a rescue by first responders

More than half of Canadians support ban on handguns, assault rifles: study

Divide between rural and urban respondents in latest Angus Reid Institute public opinion study

Spring rain needed as B.C. sees one of the lowest snowpack levels in 40 years

Snowpack levels in B.C. recorded on May 15 were similar to those in 2015 and 2016

Theresa May to quit as party leader June 7, sparking race for new PM

The new Conservative leader will become prime minister without the need for a general election

B.C. man who fell off cliff returns there to rescue eagle from vulture attack

Nanaimo’s James Farkas, who broke his hip in a fall, saves eagle on same beach months later

Most Read