Lee Reid of the Seniors Economic Environment Development Project (SEEDS) is hoping to help Nelson’s economy with self-sufficient food production by growing vegetables in the Lakeside Park greenhouses.

Nelson seniors group plants food idea

Plants could be growing in Nelson’s Lakeside Park greenhouses as soon as September thanks to a new project by a group of local seniors.

Plants could be growing in Nelson’s Lakeside Park greenhouses as soon as September thanks to a new project spearheaded by a group of local seniors.

The initiative called SEEDS — Seniors Economic Environment Development Project — is hoping to help Nelson’s economy with self-sufficient food production by growing vegetables in the greenhouses.

“The idea came from the earth,” said Lee Reid after her presentation at a committee of the whole meeting last month. “I think it’s been gathering energy over time. Parks employees are interested. Seniors love gardening. City council has a history of being interested in this sort of thing, and this is the time for sustainable food production that supports the economy and nutrition of low-income people, which includes seniors, families and other individuals.”

As a gardener herself, Reid recognized the “vitality and active intelligence” of retired seniors in the community.

“I thought how could we harness this to promote growth in the community and it occurred to me that we needed a project and most of us had been involved in caretaking projects throughout our lives. This seemed like something that would bring everyone together, almost like a harmonizer,” she said.

Reid and the SEEDS members want to make the project more than just a seniors based initiative. In addition to donating fresh produce to the Nelson Food Cupboard, SEEDS hopes to incorporate local youth and other organizations.

“We are hoping to mentor and share skills with youth from the Youth Centre under the Work Skills and Work Link program,” said Reid. “We are partnering with Earth Matters who want to grow at least herbs in the greenhouse and are on our advisory committee. The college is interested in terms of their permaculture program.”

The group has also contacted the EcoSociety about the possibility of leasing and renting plots in the greenhouse and selling the produce through markets.

“We are interested in having an outlet to distribute the food and we are going to approach council about using the concession stand, which is only used three months of the year in the summer,” said Reid.

SEEDs will be working on a feasibility study and business plan with the goal of beginning planting in the Fall.

For more information or to get involved contact Reid at 250-352-3870 or email leereid@telus.net

 

Just Posted

Michelle Mungall’s baby first in B.C. legislature chamber

B.C. energy minister praises support of staff, fellow MLAs

‘Police are ready’ for legal pot, say Canadian chiefs

But Canadians won’t see major policing changes as pot becomes legal

Leafs Roundup: Nelson goes 3-for-3

Leafs beat Creston Valley, Osoyoos and Spokane

Voters pack Nelson mayoral forum

Candidates answered questions from journalist Glenn Hicks

EDITORIAL: Nelson mayor’s race uninspiring

An incumbent mayor, a former mayor and a clown walk into a forum

VIDEO: Monday Roundup!

Elections stuff, youth homelessness, WEED!

Transport Canada to take new look at rules, research on school bus seatbelts

Canada doesn’t currently require seatbelts on school buses

Sockeye run in Shuswap expected to be close to 2014 numbers

Salute to the Sockeye on Adams River continues until Sunday, Oct. 21 at 4 p.m.

Canucks: Pettersson in concussion protocol, Beagle out with broken forearm

Head coach Travis Green called the hit ‘a dirty play’

5 tips for talking to your kids about cannabis

Health officials recommend sharing a harm reduction-related message.

NHL players say Canada’s legalization of marijuana won’t impact them

NHL players say the legalization of marijuana in Canada won’t change how they go about their business.

Automated cars could kill wide range of jobs, federal documents say

Internal government documents show that more than one million jobs could be lost to automated vehicles, with ripple effects far beyond the likeliest professions.

B.C.’s marijuana stores should shut down, Mike Farnworth says

Province has approved 62 licences, but they still need local approval

HPV vaccine does not lead to riskier sex among teen girls: UBC

Girls are less likely to have sex now than they were a decade ago

Most Read