The fall leaves buried under snow with the rake

November clear skies atypical for Nelson

While the month of November started out with typical wet weather, a week of clear skies brought unseasonably cold conditions later on.

While the month of November started out with typical wet weather, a week of clear skies brought unseasonably cold conditions later in the month.

Ron Lakeman of the Southeast Fire Centre’s weather services said the main storm cycles of the month came during the initial week of the month and then again on November 15 to 19.

“As is typical of November, several Pacific disturbances produced significant precipitation — both rain and snow — at times,” said Lakeman.

The first snowfall of the season was scant at 0.2 centimetres during the early morning of November 4. Snow accumulated on the 7th but rapidly melted, he said.

November saw 58.8 millimetres of rain and 28.2 centimetres of snow fall. Rain was above normal at 104 per cent while snowfall was below at 77 per cent of normal.

In 1973, the record for November was set for total precipitation at 186.9 millimetres. In 1976, 21.7 millimetres fell marking a low. This year, 84.6 millimetres of the wet stuff came down in November, which was 91 per cent of normal.

Not typical of November was the blocking ridge of high pressure, which allowed for a lack of precipitation and at times fairly clear skies from the 20th to the 28th.

“The clear and dry conditions produced unseasonably cold temperatures for a few days,” said Lakeman. The coldest day of the month (-10.8 degrees) was recorded during the early morning of the 22nd. “Valley cloud eventually developed which moderated the local temperatures the final few days of this period.”

Temperatures averaged out to be very near normal with the warmest day being November 14 at 10.2 degrees. The monthly record high was 19.2 in 1975 and the coldest was -20.2 degrees in 1977.

A more typical Pacific storm track returned for occasional rain and wet snow at months end.

The only record during the month was the mean maximum temperature (the warmest average temperature) of 6.6 degrees on the 19th.

 

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