The Crescent Valley beach is expected to become a regional park next year.

Planning underway on Crescent Valley beach

The Regional District of Centraly Kootenay continues to work on turning the Crescent Valley beach into a regional park.

Although the official transfer of the property isn’t expected to be complete until year’s end, the Regional District of Central Kootenay continues to work on turning the Crescent Valley beach into a regional park.

It was announced almost a year ago that the longtime owners are donating the 6.6 acres (2.6 hectares) to the regional district, including the popular beach used by the public for generations.

While they don’t yet have title to the land, community services manager Joe Chirico says they’ve started the planning process.

“We’ve had lots of co-operation from the land owner,” he said in an interview. “This summer we did an archaeological assessment and right now we’re working with a biologist to identify a species at risk.”

The latter is the western screech owl. Chirico said they need to have more conversations about how to incorporate its presence into their plan.

The archeologist’s report, meanwhile, identified the old Patrick sawmill site as well as pre-contact First Nations sites, according to parks supervisor Cary Gaynor.

“We look forward to having a park there to protect those areas,” he said. “The hope is having a park can create interpretation [opportunities].”

Planning is expected to begin early next year, with a public process and development of a more detailed outline of the work to commence in spring.

Chirico says their prime concern is safety.

“In particular, anyone who’s been along that stretch will know the parking situation is congested,” he says. “Our first priority will be working with the Ministry of Transportation and trying to improve that situation.”

Other basic infrastructure may be added, including washrooms and picnic table.

The initial capital costs, including surveying, subdivision, and parking are expected to be $60,000 to $80,000 while annual maintenance is project at $13,000 to $20,000.

Just Posted

NDP bring Green New Deal to the Kootenays

MPs Wayne Stetski and Peter Julian held climate change talks in Nelson, Cranbrook and Revelstoke

COLUMN: Teens take to the water with Columbia River Field School

From Nelson Star columnist Eileen Delehanty Pearkes

LETTER: NDP and Greens should team up

From reader Diana van Eyk

Elk River reclaims property as its own

Laws make it harder to protect private land than ever before says farmer, local government

Smoke-free summer a boon for West Kootenay tourism

Tourism centres seeing numbers up

Ethnic media aim to help maintain boost in voting by new Canadians

Statistics Canada says new Canadians made up about one-fifth of the voting population in 2016

Speculation tax forces sale of Greater Victoria’s iconic ‘Tulip House’

Bob and Jan Fleming selling their retirement home famous for its thousands of tulips

New police force in Surrey must avoid VPD, RCMP errors made in Pickton case: Oppal

Boots are scheduled to be on the ground by spring 2021

Man at centre of dropped HIV-disclosure case sues province and 10 cops

Brian Carlisle of Abbotsford says Mission RCMP defamed him and were ‘negligent’ in their investigation

Conan turns to the Property Brothers for tips on buying Greenland

Jonathan Scott suggests removing glaciers and mountains to bring in ‘more natural light’

Forests minister visits B.C. town rocked by multiple mill shutdowns

A third of Mackenzie turns out for rally, not much to cheer about

B.C. sockeye returns drop as official calls 2019 ‘extremely challenging’

Federal government says officials are seeing the same thing off Alaska and Washington state

Expanded support to help B.C. youth from care attend university still falling short

Inadequate support, limited awareness and eligibility restrictions some of the existing challenges

Most Read