Canada’s next Ambassador to China is B.C.-raised Dominic Barton

Canada’s next Ambassador to China is B.C.-raised Dominic Barton

Barton graduated from high school in Chilliwack where he demonstrated a fierce talent for debating

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced the appointment of Dominic Barton — who grew up in Chilliwack — as Canada’s Ambassador to China.

The PMO announcement cited Barton’s experience in Asia, his mastery of global economics, and stint advising cabinet as relevant background for the appointment.

Those were some of the reasons why he’ll make “a great choice to represent Canada — and Canadian interests — in China,” PM Trudeau was quoted as saying in the Sept. 4 release.

Barton will advise the PM directly on China, with the delicate goal of mending the relationship between the two countries, since his predecessor, John McCallum was forced to step down in January after key missteps.

Barton said he looks forward to the new challenge.

“It is an honour to be appointed as Canada’s Ambassador to China. The relationship between Canada and China is an important one, and I will work hard to represent our great country and to resolve the challenges that currently exist,” Barton said.

READ MORE: Economic advisor to named ambassador to China

Some folks remember when Barton was a teenager in Chilliwack.

Barry Penner, a former B.C. Liberal cabinet minister and long-time MLA for Chilliwack-Kent, remembers the Barton family moving to Chilliwack in the mid-1970s. They lived on Edson Drive near Sardis secondary, and that’s where Penner met Anthony, Dominic’s younger brother.

One day, Anthony brought an election sign and stickers into the classroom, which was not appreciated one bit by the teacher of a different political persuasion, Penner remembered. The lawn sign was for Alexander Patterson, the sitting Tory MP.

“I remember that Dominic was quite active politically as a member of the Fraser Valley Young Progressive Conservatives,” Penner said.

His dad, Rev. John Barton was the rector at St. John’s Anglican, where the Tory MP at the time, Alexander Patterson, attended church.

MP Patterson represented the PCs from 1972 to 1984 for Fraser Valley East.

“It’s interesting that he (Barton) seems pretty close these days to the Prime Minister and (Foreign Affairs Minister) Chrystia Freeland,” Penner said.

It’s clear Barton had a taste for politics from quite early on.

An excellent student, Barton was a scholarship winner and a champion debater while at Sardis Secondary.

He enjoyed the privilege of attending the Forum for Young Canadians in Ottawa in 1980, where he toured the House of Commons and participated in mock Parliament as the leader of the Opposition.

“It was a great opportunity to meet people and see how Canada is run,” Barton is quoted as saying in an April 9, 1980 story in the Chilliwack Progress, maybe foreshadowing a tad.

He raised $400 on his own to attend the forum in the nation’s capital.

Barton was also mentioned in The Progress, for his valedictorian speech of June 18, 1980, where he waxes eloquent on the shining potential of his classmates:

“Barton exhorted the gathering of parents and friends to recognize the abilities and eagerness of the graduating class in tackling the problems that lie ahead for us all,” according to The Progress article.

“He pressed his point saying, ‘And those of you who don’t think there are problems and an energy crisis — wake up!’”

Barton eventually graduated from the University of British Columbia with an Honours Bachelor of Arts in Economics, and studied as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University, where he obtained his Master of Philosophy in Economics.

He also holds eight honourary doctorates from academic institutions around the world.

But it’s Barton’s expertise in Asia that will serve him particularly well in the new role.

He is a Senior Trustee of the Brookings Institution, a member of the Singapore Economic Development Board’s International Advisory Council, and a member of the boards of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City and the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada.

He is one of the founders of FCLTGlobal (Focusing Capital on the Long Term), has co-authored four books, and is an Adjunct Professor at Tsinghua University in Beijing. He chaired Trudeau’s Economic Growth advisory council, and became chair of Teck Resources last October. From 2009 to 2018, Barton was the global managing partner at McKinsey & Co., gaining prodigious experience in international business and trade.

READ MORE: Cabinet retreat to mull over Trump


@CHWKjourno
jfeinberg@theprogress.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A rainbow shining on Kelowna General Hospital on May 12, 2020 International Nurses Day. (Steve Wensley - Prime Light Media)
New COVID cases trending down in Interior Health

24 new cases reported Thursday, Feb. 25, death at Kelowna General Hospital

Sylvain Fabi, Canada’s chief negotiator for the Columbia River Treaty, joined a number of government and Indigenous government stakeholders for a virtual town hall on Feb. 24, 2021, to update the state of the Columbia River Treaty negotiations. Trevor Crawley photo/Zoom screenshot
Indigenous input key to Columbia River Treaty negotiations

Ecosystem function included in negotiations along with flood management and power generation priorities

Shayna Jones. Photo: Louis Bockner
Kaslo performer collects stories of Black rural experience

Shayna Jones will create a performance piece about Black people ‘tucked away in the countryside’

The Feb. 25, 2021 edition of the Nelson Star might be a little late getting to your door. File photo
Snow delays latest Nelson Star issue

We are done with the white stuff

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature. (B.C. government)
B.C. reports 10 additional deaths, 395 new COVID-19 cases

The majority of new coronavirus infections were in the Fraser Health region

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

A new survey has found that virtual visits are British Columbian’s preferred way to see the doctor amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (Unsplash)
Majority of British Columbians now prefer routine virtual doctor’s visits: study

More than 82% feel virtual health options reduce wait times, 64% think they lead to better health

Captain and Maria, a pair of big and affectionate akbash dogs, must be adopted together because they are so closely bonded. (SPCA image)
Shuswap SPCA seeks forever home for inseparable Akbash dogs

A fundraiser to help medical expenses for Captain and Maria earned over 10 times its goal

The missing camper heard a GSAR helicopter, and ran from his tree well waving his arms. File photo
Man trapped on Manning mountain did nearly everything right to survive: SAR

The winter experienced camper was overwhelmed by snow conditions

Cory Mills, Eric Blackmore and A.J. Jensen, all 20, drown in the Sooke River in February 2020. (Contributed photos)
Coroner confirms ‘puddle jumping’ in 2020 drowning deaths of 3 B.C. men

Cory Mills, Eric Blackmore and A.J. Jensen pulled into raging river driving through nearby flooding

Ashley Paxman, 29, is in the ICU after being struck by a vehicle along Highway 97 Feb. 18, 2021. She remains in critical condition. (GoFundMe)
Okanagan woman in ICU with broken bones in face after being struck by car

She remains in serious condition following Feb. 18 incident

Vancouver International Women in Film Festival kicks off March 5.
Women in Film Festival features two B.C. filmmakers

The 16th annual festival kicks off March 5, 2021

The booklet roots present day activism in the history of racist policies, arguing the history must be acknowledged in order to change. (CCPA)
New resource dives into 150 years of racist policy in B.C.

Racist history must be acknowledged in order to change, authors say

Most Read