Regional District of Central Kootenay chair John Kettle and Attorney General Suzanne Anton. The RDCK is now participating in a system to resolve bylaw disputes outside court.

RDCK embraces bylaw adjudication

The Regional District of Central Kootenay is the latest local government to take bylaw disputes out of the hands of the courts.

The Regional District of Central Kootenay is the latest local government to join a bylaw adjudication system where minor infractions can be disputed before an independent adjudicator instead of taken to court.

The bylaw adjudication system is offered through the Ministry of Justice and is intended to save local governments time and money and make more efficient use of court resources.

Each jurisdiction determines which bylaws it would like included in the process. The RDCK plans to use the system to enforce noise complaints, animal control, unsightly premises, building, some zoning and other similar bylaw disputes.

“The Regional District of Central Kootenay is looking forward to implementing the bylaw dispute adjudication system, which we anticipate will save and help recover costs related to bylaw infractions,” chair John Kettle said in a news release. “Ultimately, our taxpayers will be the beneficiaries of this program.”

“Taking a matter to court can be a lengthy process. This system saves people time and helps reduce pressure on the courts without increasing costs to taxpayers,” Attorney General and Justice Minister Suzanne Anton said in the same release. With the addition of the Regional District of Central Kootenay,  65 local governments are now using or developing the bylaw adjudication system, she said.

The City of Nelson has been using a bylaw adjudication process for more than two years. In that time, only three cases have proceeded to actual adjudication hearings, with the city winning each time.

However, the police department has said it consumes a lot of their time, as officers administer the process. The city writes 1,200 tickets each month, of which about 50 are disputed.

Just Posted

Glacier Gymnastics big winner in annual grant funding

Columbia Basin Trust doled out $1.4 million in grants to the regional organizations

Procter working to reopen community bakery

The Procter Community Society is fundraising upwards of $100,000 for the project

Kaslo bus fueled by vegetable oil to begin service next month

Mountain Man Mike’s will run routes to Vancouver and eventually Edmonton

KAST receives $15,000 for inclusive programs at Nelson Tech Club

‘These programs will be a perfect introduction to using technology’

Nelson to send two musicians to provincial Festival of The Arts

Lucas Alexander and Nico Bucher will compete in Chilliwack later this month

QUIZ: Test your knowledge of Victoria Day

How much do you know about the monarch whose day we celebrate each May?

Top women’s hockey player Natalie Spooner coming to B.C.

Natalie Spooner special guest at annual Grindstone charity weekend in Kelowna

Take-home drug testing kits latest pilot to help curb B.C.’s overdose crisis

Researchers look to see if fentanyl testing could be a useful tool for those who use drugs alone

Facebook takes down anti-vaxxer page that used image of late Canadian girl

Facebook said that the social media company has disabled the anti-vaccination page

Search crews rescue kids, 6 and 7, stranded overnight on Coquitlam mountain

Father and two youngsters fall down a steep, treacherous cliff while hiking Burke Mountain

Raptors beat Bucks 118-112 in 2OT thriller

Leonard has 36 points as Toronto cuts Milwaukee’s series lead to 2-1

‘Teams that win are tight’: B.C. Lions search for chemistry at training camp

The Lions added more than 50 new faces over the off-season, from coaching staff to key players

Rescue crews suspend search for Okanagan kayaker missing for three days

71-year-old Zygmunt Janiewicz was reported missing Friday

B.C. VIEWS: Reality of our plastic recycling routine exposed

Turns out dear old China wasn’t doing such a great job

Most Read