Regional District of Central Kootenay chair John Kettle and Attorney General Suzanne Anton. The RDCK is now participating in a system to resolve bylaw disputes outside court.

RDCK embraces bylaw adjudication

The Regional District of Central Kootenay is the latest local government to take bylaw disputes out of the hands of the courts.

The Regional District of Central Kootenay is the latest local government to join a bylaw adjudication system where minor infractions can be disputed before an independent adjudicator instead of taken to court.

The bylaw adjudication system is offered through the Ministry of Justice and is intended to save local governments time and money and make more efficient use of court resources.

Each jurisdiction determines which bylaws it would like included in the process. The RDCK plans to use the system to enforce noise complaints, animal control, unsightly premises, building, some zoning and other similar bylaw disputes.

“The Regional District of Central Kootenay is looking forward to implementing the bylaw dispute adjudication system, which we anticipate will save and help recover costs related to bylaw infractions,” chair John Kettle said in a news release. “Ultimately, our taxpayers will be the beneficiaries of this program.”

“Taking a matter to court can be a lengthy process. This system saves people time and helps reduce pressure on the courts without increasing costs to taxpayers,” Attorney General and Justice Minister Suzanne Anton said in the same release. With the addition of the Regional District of Central Kootenay,  65 local governments are now using or developing the bylaw adjudication system, she said.

The City of Nelson has been using a bylaw adjudication process for more than two years. In that time, only three cases have proceeded to actual adjudication hearings, with the city winning each time.

However, the police department has said it consumes a lot of their time, as officers administer the process. The city writes 1,200 tickets each month, of which about 50 are disputed.

Just Posted

Feds, B.C. to expand Darkwoods Conservation area

New funding allows the national land trust to add some 7,900 hectares to the Darkwoods Conservation Area

Good fencing makes good neighbours— especially when your neighbours are bears

Workshop in Pass Creek this weekend to promote benefits of proper protection for livestock

Laird Creek residents still hoping for independent report on logging road

Logging company wants to reopen road that residents believe caused slide in 2011

Kootenay region posts 10-per-cent return rate on electoral reform ballots

As of Nov. 13, only 5.3 per cent of ballots had been returned province-wide

Protesters confront Environment Minister in B.C.

Protesters wanting more for killer whales confront Catherine McKenna

Humans reshaping evolutionary history of species around the globe: paper

University of British Columbia researcher had the paper published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society

Toronto ‘carding’ activist Desmond Cole stopped by police in Vancouver

Cole says his experience reveals what daily life is like for black and Indigenous residents

Commercial trucks banned from left lane of Coquihalla

B.C.’s Ministry of Transportation has introduced a new program that hopes to prevent accidents and closures on the Coquihalla Highway.

B.C. on track to record same number of overdose deaths as last year

128 people died of overdoses in September, bringing the total to more than 1,100 so far in 2018

B.C. firefighters rescue horse stuck in mud

‘It happens more often than you’d think,’ says deputy chief

Canadians more prepared for weather disaster than financial one: poll

RBC recommends people check their bank app as often as the weather app

B.C. dog owner sues after pet killed in beaver trap

A Kamloops man is suing the operator of a trapline north of the city after his dog died

Most Read