The new Nelson transfer station will be near Pacific Insight.

RDCK offers to compensate Pacific Insight

The regional district is offering Pacific Insight more than $117,000 in compensation over the move of the Nelson transfer station.

The Regional District of Central Kootenay is offering Pacific Insight more than $117,000 in compensation over the move of the Nelson transfer station to a site near its plant.

According to a motion passed last week, the one-time payment would be for “sharing of infrastructure development costs,” and is subject to the electronics manufacturer agreeing to allow the regional district “unrestricted access to their fire protection water tank should the need arise for the purpose of fire protection.”

The motion also directs staff to adjust the budget accordingly if the offer is accepted.

The proposed move of the transfer station from the city’s waterfront to a 22-acre site five kilometers west of the city enraged Pacific Insight when it was announced over the summer.

The company argued that as one of the community’s largest employers and the closest neighbour, they should have been consulted before the regional district reached a purchase agreement on the property.

However, the regional district contended everything was done above board and Pacific Insight was notified as quickly as possible.

The company’s concerns included the effect on its corporate image as well as traffic safety — trucks headed for the new transfer station will turn off at the highway at the Insight plant.

When the $3.3 million plan was approved in August, the board directed staff to work with Insight to “ensure issues raised during the public consultation process … are appropriately addressed.”

Director Ron Mickel, who chairs the central resource recovery committee, also told the Star at the time the door was open to compensating Insight “based on expenses they’ve incurred setting up the infrastructure we will be benfitting from.”

He cited the left-turn lane Insight helped pay for as one example.

“I don’t think we’re looking at huge sums here, but I think it’s more a recognition of the benefits that we’re going to incur,” he said.

According to the committee’s minutes, they met with Stuart Ross and Tom Mamic of Pacific Insight and former area director Al Dawson for about an hour on October 20.

Directors then went in camera for half an hour, after which Kaslo mayor Greg Lay moved that Pacific Insight be offered a one-time payment of $37,000 in exchange for unrestricted access to the company’s water tank should the need arise.

However, rural Kaslo director Andy Shadrack suggested an amendment to increase the amount to $117,400. The motion passed, with Salmo mayor Ann Henderson recorded as opposed, and was ratified by the full board last week.

A series of other recommendations related to Pacific Insight and the transfer station were also adopted, including placing a covenant on the property stating it will not be used for landfill, incineration, or composting purposes.

The regional district will also take Pacific Insight’s shift changes into account when scheduling the transfer station’s operating hours and load hauling.

It will further work with the Ministry of Transportation to assume stewardship of Insight Drive and prevent littering and illegal dumping. However, it will not ask the ministry for any additional infrastructure — such as a crosswalk, lights, or acceleration lane.

Mickel and Ramona Faust, whose electoral area Pacific Insight falls in, were both away this week and unavailable for comment.

Pacific Insight did not immediately return a message left Wednesday afternoon.

MOVING COSTS

The $117,400 the RDCK is offering Pacific Insight in compensation over the new transfer station amounts to about a 3.5 per cent surcharge on the initial budget.

Purchase price of the land: $610,000

Capital costs to develop the site: $2.5 million

Remediation of existing transfer station: $170,000

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