Practice social distancing at the waste and recycling bins to help prevent the spread of coronavirus, asks RDCK. File photo

RDCK takes measures to protect onsite waste and recycling staff

Free tipping fees for homeowners, but caution not to overuse it

The Regional District of Central Kootenay is changing the operation of its waste disposal system in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

And that will include not charging homeowners to dispose of their household waste.

The RDCK is taking further steps to protect its staff from the coronavirus, which is known to have infected 472 British Columbians to date, killing 13.

SEE: B.C. reports 3 new COVID-19 deaths but 100 people have recovered, Henry says

The regional district is beginning with distancing, and says residents should stay away if they feel sick or may have been exposed to the virus. Everyone should oberve strict social distancing when at the waste or recycling bins.

It asks residents to try to limit their visits — only coming to the landfills or transfer stations when necessary.

“While isolation at home is a great opportunity to do yard work, purge your closets, or complete renovations, waste materials from these projects can remain at home for now,” staff caution.

Trips should be limited to getting rid of waste that could attract pests or is starting to smell, it says.

“If you have access to curbside collection, please use that service and do not come to our facilities,” the RDCK asks. “Rural residents dropping off household garbage, our municipal curbside collection partners, and commercial collectors take priority right now.”

Respect free tipping, RDCK asks

Staff will also stop accepting cash and debit, to reduce contact.

“We will no longer accept any payments from residents who wish to dispose of waste and recyclables at our facilities (excluding Edgewood and Burton),” says the RDCK’s release.

There are provisos, however. Residential loads will be limited to household garbage only, and no bulky items will be accepted. “We will accept up to one pick-up truck load (or equivalent) maximum per week per customer,” the RDCK says.

“These are emergency measures during very challenging times,” said Uli Wolf, general manager of environmental services at the RDCK. “We ask that you respect the free tipping limits so our essential services are not overwhelmed, and can remain open and operational.

“Remember, waste management is not free — these costs will be relayed to all of our taxpayers. Abuse may result in further reduction of services or site closures.”

Commercial loads will continue as per normal, as no money exchanges hands. The RDCK says it will still accept all material types and charges will placed on accounts. However, receipts will not be provided.

The regular hours of operation will remain in effect for now, says the RDCK.

Finally, some bad news for inveterate deal-seekers: the free stores will also be closed for the duration.



reporter@rosslandnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Three face charges in Nelson fentanyl busts

Two men and a woman were arrested in two separate incidents

Nelson cyclist run over by truck

Driver ticketed for failing to yield right of way on left turn

Hwy 1 flooding causes massive delays on certain Arrow Lakes ferry routes

Motorists have been waiting around three hours to get on ferries

RDCK: spring flooding financial relief available

The provincial funds are for those affected by flooding in May and early June

Pamela Allain, Laura Gellatly join the Nelson Star

Allain oversees Black Press’s West Kootenay papers, while Gellatly is the Star’s new publisher

B.C. accommodators need phone lines to light up as in-province travel given green light

Travel restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic have decimated the tourism and hospitality industries

300 Cache Creek residents on evacuation alert due to flood risk as river rises

Heavy rainfall on Canada Day has river rising steadily, threatening 175 properties

First glimpse of Canada’s true COVID-19 infection rate expected mid-July

At least 105,000 Canadians have tested positive for COVID-19 since the coronavirus was identified

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Stop enforcing sex work laws during COVID-19, advocates say

There are provisions in Canada’s prostitution laws that make workers immune from prosecution, but not from arrest

Most Read