Proposed townhouses at the Shorelines development. There would also be garden homes and condos. Illustration: Culos Group/ City of Nelson

Proposed townhouses at the Shorelines development. There would also be garden homes and condos. Illustration: Culos Group/ City of Nelson

Shorelines developer provides drawings, answers Nelson council’s questions

The housing project would be located on the former Kutenai Landing site beside the Chahko Mika Mall

Kelowna developer Mike Culos provided drawings of his proposed Shorelines development and answered questions at Nelson City Council’s July 26 meeting.

The housing development would be built on the former Kutanai Landing site next to the Chahko Mika Mall.

The full project includes 24 townhouses expected to range in price from $680,000 to $780,000, eight garden homes at approximately $800,000, and 40 to 45 condos that will range from $300,000 to $1.2 million. There would also be commercial space on the ground floor of the condos and a 60-slip marina.

The company is now applying for a development permit for the townhouses and garden homes, and will apply for the condos and marina at a later date.

The Nelson Star reported on many of the details of the project on June 17 at https://bit.ly/3ozWgXD.

The proposed Shorelines development would be built south of Lakeside Drive, east of Cedar Street, and west of the mall. Map: Culos Developments/ City of Nelson

The proposed Shorelines development would be built south of Lakeside Drive, east of Cedar Street, and west of the mall. Map: Culos Developments/ City of Nelson

At the July 26 meeting, councillors asked why the company’s drawings show no sidewalk on the block of Cedar Street adjoining the development. Culos said marina parking and a sidewalk are competing interests in that block, and that perhaps some accommodation could be made.

City manager Kevin Cormack said the city would find a way to build a sidewalk on Cedar, even it if has to vary the zoning for the marina to require less parking.

The marina would be public, Culos said, and some of it may feature metered parking for boats. It may include a restaurant.

Culos said Cedar Street adjacent to the development would be a cul-de-sac, only accessible by vehicles from Lakeside Drive, but accessible from the south by walkers and cyclists.

Responding to a question from Councillor Rik Logtenberg, Culos said he had not read Nelson Next, the city’s climate change plan.

One of the goals of Nelson Next is more active transportation (walking, biking and transit) and fewer vehicles in the city, Logtenberg said, adding that the city likes to see projects that support those values and that don’t prioritize cars and parking.

Culos said there will be bike and car charging stations in every unit.

The council discussion about the development can be found here:

Culos said that for the townhouses and garden homes, the city requires 42 parking spaces (1.5 per unit) but the development will provide 92 spaces. Each unit has a two-car garage with additional off-street guest parking. This is different from the condos in the second stage, which will have underground parking with fewer spaces per unit.

Councillor Keith Page asked about energy efficiency. Culos said the construction will be to Step 3 of the BC Energy Step Code, which is the level at which the city now requires in new construction. The step code is a series of five steps, each with increasingly advanced energy saving standards.

Culos said the buildings will be heated with gas, with electric hot water.

Logtenberg asked about heat pumps. Culos responded that heat pumps often require backup electric heat, but that the company is considering installing them.

Referring to the energy efficiency of the proposed buildings and the materials that will be used to achieve it, Culos said, “We are as close to the top of the heap as we can get and still be economically viable.”

Townhouses such as these, and garden homes, would be the first stage of development, with condos coming later. Illustration: Culos Group/ City of Nelson

Townhouses such as these, and garden homes, would be the first stage of development, with condos coming later. Illustration: Culos Group/ City of Nelson

City manager Kevin Cormack pointed out that the property is a brownfield site, having been a dump for sawmill waste in the past. Culos said there is one to two metres of sawdust underground at the site, and the buildings would be built on pilings driven 20 metres deep.

Culos told the Nelson Star that following permits from the city and the province he hopes to begin pouring concrete at the site by early October.

READ MORE:

Developer hopes to build 125 residential units at former Kutenai Landing site

• BUSINESS BUZZ: Kutenai Landing parcel in play, B.C. business is optimistic

Marina at former Kutenai Landing site will be half non-motorized

Nelson council increases energy efficiency requirements for new homes

Nelson publishes unique guide on low-carbon building materials



bill.metcalfe@nelsonstar.com

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