Students at South Nelson elementary school participated in a Canada-wide science lesson on gravity with hopes of getting into the Guinness Book of World Records.

Students at South Nelson elementary school participated in a Canada-wide science lesson on gravity with hopes of getting into the Guinness Book of World Records.

South Nelson students join world record setting attempt

Students at South Nelson elementary school joined thousands of Canadians in a science lesson they hope will break a world record.



Students at South Nelson elementary school joined thousands of Canadians in a science lesson they hope will break a world record.

On Friday morning, 75 eager-to-learn Grade 4 and 5 students filled the gym paper airplanes in hand at the exact same time people across the country were doing the same thing vying for a spot in the Guinness Book of World Records.

By constructing and flying three different paper airplanes they learned about gravity and atmosphere on Earth, Mars and the Moon.

Organizing teacher Daphne Van Alstine told the buzzing crowd of kids, “All across the country, there are thousands of other students doing this. You’re part of something really big… Let’s have fun.”

Organized in teams of three, the students sent three differently made paper airplanes sailing across the gym and measured how far each went. The planes were modified to mimic conditions on the Earth, Mars and the Moon.

Van Alstine, who helps coordinate the regional science fair, said the student’s enthusiasm continued throughout the duration of the 30-minute lesson.

“It was fantastic,” she said. “They kept that up every throw. It was just as exciting.”

She was pleased to see the students take the event seriously and collaborate with each other. Above all, she enjoyed seeing them learn through a fun activity. “With anything novel, the brain is more engaged,” she said.

The Canadian government initiative was organized during National Science and Technology week. Over the next few weeks all the required evidence will be collected and forwarded to Guinness to see if the science lesson broke records.

In 2012, over 13,701 Canadians at 88 locations set the record for the Largest Practical Science Lesson at multiple locations.