Margaret Stacey during the Central School all-candidates forum last week. The veteran councillor didn’t make the cut on Saturday night.

Margaret Stacey during the Central School all-candidates forum last week. The veteran councillor didn’t make the cut on Saturday night.

Stacey gets ready for next challenge

Margaret Stacey was denied a third term at City Hall Saturday night, the only incumbent not to receive a return trip.

Margaret Stacey was denied a third term at City Hall Saturday night, the only incumbent not to receive a return trip.

“Perhaps [I’m disappointed], but I’m not disappointed for Nelson,” said Stacey, who was in attendance at Mayor John Dooley’s party.

“We have a lot of juice in that team and this mayor… I’m delighted to see them go at it for the next three years.”

In his speech on Saturday night, Dooley said he was sad to see Stacey come up short.

“I’m sorry to see Margaret go. She has been a good councillor and a good friend,” Dooley said.

“Having said that, all these things happen for a reason and I know Margaret will go on and continue to be one of those people who contribute to our community like she did before she was elected. It’s a loss at the council table, but it will be a gain for some other organization in our municipality that she gets involved with.”

Stacey was the longtime Capitol Theatre manager and a Nelson citizen of the year. She came onto the local political scene during the 2005 election where she finished fifth in the council race to earn her first seat at City Hall. In the 2008 race Stacey finished second to Deb Kozak.

“I did not run an aggressive campaign, but I do it my way,” Stacey told the Star after the results came in. “I’m not a door knocker or a sign placer.”

Other council members added that Stacey’s voice at the table will be missed.

“It will be a loss for sure,” said Macdonald. “Margaret brings a very individual perspective to things. She’s a very thoughtful person and asks challenging questions and is a strong proponent for arts and culture, which of course I always appreciated. We will definitely miss her because she encouraged us to think differently at times.”

As for her work at the table over the last six years, Stacey said she is most proud of the way she helped council become a less raucous table.

“I think there is a certain civility on city council now,” she said.

“It was a very partisan outfit before I got there, I don’t know if I can attribute that to me, but I don’t like bad behaviour and we didn’t see any of that this last term. We have had a lot of dignity at the table and it’s something I take pride in.”