Trudeau urges patience as Wet’suwet’en mull over proposed land and title deal

Pipeline dispute has meant difficult times for many Canadians over the past few weeks, Trudeau says

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he knows people are impatient for a resolution to tensions involving a disputed natural gas pipeline in northern British Columbia, but time is needed to respect the traditions of the Wet’suwet’en people.

Speaking to reporters in Halifax this morning, Trudeau acknowledged the opposition of some Wet’suwet’en leaders to the Coastal GasLink pipeline has led to difficult times for many Canadians over the past few weeks.

He said his government has been focused on trying to find a solution, but added that current tensions stem from centuries of marginalizing Indigenous Peoples in Canada.

Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs and senior federal and B.C. cabinet ministers reached a proposed agreement over the weekend, but details are not being released until the Wet’suwet’en people are consulted through their traditional feast process, which could take up to two weeks.

Trudeau says his government is respecting this process, but he sidestepped a question about how the deal will affect the pipeline project.

READ MORE: Wet’suwet’en chiefs, ministers reach proposed agreement in B.C. pipeline dispute

ALSO READ: Elected Wet’suwet’en councillor calls for inclusivity in consensus building over deal

The draft accord only deals with land and title rights and B.C. Premier John Horgan has said the pipeline project will go ahead.

The Canadian Press

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