Trump honours military dog at White House after al-Baghdadi raid

President on Conan, a Belgian Malinois: ‘Right now, probably the world’s most famous dog’

President Donald Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and first lady Melania Trump present Conan, the military working dog injured in the successful operation targeting Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, before the media in the Rose Garden at the White House, Monday, Nov. 25, 2019 in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

A U.S. military dog that played a starring role in the raid that killed Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi seemed oblivious to the praise that President Donald Trump heaped on him Monday at the White House.

Conan, a Belgian Malinois, seemed much more interested in the head scratches from Mike Pence, repeatedly looking up at the vice-president in search of more attention.

Trump used a slew of adjectives to describe Conan, who was injured when he was exposed to electric wires in the late October raid while chasing al-Baghdadi at the terrorist’s compound in northwest Syria. “Incredible.” “Brilliant.” “Smart.” “Ultimate fighter.” “Very special.” “Tough cookie.”

“So this is Conan,” Trump said. “Right now, probably the world’s most famous dog.”

Trump said he bestowed a medal on the dog and presented him with a plaque. First lady Melania Trump stood a few feet away.

The president said initially Conan was going to be muzzled for the appearance, but he thought that would put the dog in attack mode.

“He’s not in a bad mood today,” Trump told dozens of reporters and TV crews gathered in the Rose Garden. “So, you’re safe.”

Trump said he asked members of the U.S. special forces who met with him that day if an unarmed man would stand a chance against Conan. He said the special forces, who could not appear in public, told him “No.”

The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Columbia Basin Trust shuffles board, new leaders at the table

The Trust is governed by a 12-member Board of Directors

School District 8: No visiting Chinese students have coronavirus

SD8 says its international students have already been screened for the virus

COLUMN: Slocan Valley environmentalist deserves thanks for tenacity

Marilyn Burgoon stepped in when no one else would to ensure justice in the Lemon Creek fuel spill

VIDEO: Nelson’s Emily Taylor wins bronze at junior weightlifting nationals

Taylor was competing in Edmonton as part of Team B.C.

Leafs clinch playoff spot with weekend road wins

Brandon Costa scored twice in his debut with Nelson

VIDEO: As 106 reported dead from the coronavirus outbreak, countries look to evacuate citizens

Canada is warning its residents to not go to Hubei province at all

Pregnant B.C. woman stuck in Wuhan, the epicentre of coronavirus outbreak

Woman is due to give birth in Wuhan, China unless she can get out

After four sexual assaults in the same B.C. park, RCMP ask women not to walk alone

Four sexual assaults took place in Glen Park over two months

Taxi association asks B.C. Supreme Court to stop Uber, Lyft from operating

Petition alleges Passenger Transportation Board did not take taxis into account

Majority of Canadian boards had no female members in 2016 and 2017: StatCan

Statistics Canada says 18.1 per cent of director seats were held by women in 2017

Swapping grape varieties can help winemakers adapt to climate change: UBC study

Report says 56% of wine-grape-growing regions would be lost if global climate warms by 2 C

Alberta premier wants feds to approve Teck mine for benefit of First Nations

Kenney: ‘Surely [reconciliation] means saying yes to economic development for First Nations people’

NDP suggests easing secondary housing rules for B.C. farmland

Lana Popham proposes guest homes not just for relatives

BC Place lights up in purple and yellow to honour Kobe Bryant

Kobe Bryant, his 13-year-old daughter and seven others were killed in a helicopter crash

Most Read