Canfor and Porcupine Wood Products are expected to split the Meadow Creek Cedar forest license.

UPDATED: Canfor buys Meadow Creek Cedar license

Porcupine Wood Products is expected to acquire 60 per cent of the timber volume.

Canfor has acquired the troubled Meadow Creek Cedar forest license.

District forests manager Garth Wiggill was unavailable for an interview this week, but the ministry confirmed Canfor bought the license, which has an annual allowable cut of 96,513 cubic meters.

The ministry also said $251,000 in outstanding debts to the Crown were settled during the transfer, and Canfor will assume Meadow Creek Cedar’s outstanding obligations on the land base.

However, the property in Cooper Creek where Meadow Creek Cedar’s sawmill burned down in 2014 remains under the ownership of Dale Kooner.

Canfor spokeswoman Corinne Stavness said they have an agreement to sell approximately 60 per cent of the tenure volume to Porcupine Wood Products of Salmo, subject to government approval, and will retain the remaining 40 per cent for their own use.

The purchase price was not disclosed.

Canfor previously owned the now-demolished sawmill at Slocan, but its closest sawmills are now in Radium and Elko. Canfor shut down a Canal Flats operation last month. It purchased all three mills from Tembec three years ago.

The Meadow Creek Cedar license has twice been placed on cancellation notice due to mismanagement, but the order was lifted pending the sale.

“It is very unfortunate that the sale does not include the mill, which means we will be seeing the logs shipped right out of the area, losing any local employment opportunities for processing,” said rural Kaslo regional district director Aimee Watson.

“In an economically depressed area that was further damaged by the management of this license, the sale of the tenure without the mill is not good news.”

Still, Watson said she and Kaslo mayor Suzan Hewat are eager to meet the new owners to discuss their plans regarding both jobs and management of the tenure.

“We still hope to see the tenure properly managed and that the resources pulled from the area provide an economic benefit to the people of North Kootenay Lake,” she said.

Just Posted

National trail group decries province’s plans for West Kootenay trail

Converting trail back to motorized use will harm its international reputation, says official

Cannings to pedal through South Okanagan — West Kootenay riding

MP leaves from Nakusp on Aug. 23 and ends in Kaleden on Aug. 29.

West Kootenay Open returns to new Nelson Tennis Club

The tournament runs Friday to Sunday

PHOTOS: Nelson mural festival: ‘a huge act of community’

This year the mural festival became a music festival as well

VIDEO: Title of 25th Bond movie is ‘No Time to Die’

The film is set to be released in April 2020

New study suggests autism overdiagnosed: Canadian expert

Laurent Mottron: ‘Autistic people we test now are less and less different than typical people’

B.C. father tells judge he did not kill his young daughters

Andrew Berry pleaded not guilty to the December 2017 deaths

Trans Mountain gives contractors 30 days to get workers, supplies ready for pipeline

Crown corporation believes the expansion project could be in service by mid-2022

Rosemount cooked diced chicken linked to listeria case in B.C.

The symptoms of listeria include vomiting, nausea, fever, muscle aches

B.C. seniors allowed more choice to stay in assisted living

Province doesn’t need to wait for a complaint to investigate care, Adrian Dix says

Retired B.C. fisherman wins record $60M Lotto Max jackpot

Joseph Katalinic won the biggest Lotto Max prize ever awarded

New ‘Matrix’ film set with Keanu Reeves and Lana Wachowski

Fourth installment to feature Reeves as Neo and Carrie-Anne Moss as Trinity

Most Read