Wildflower students adopt Duck Bay

Students plant shrubs, unveil a new sign and participate in scientific study

Wildflower students Trey Philips and Arlo Henderson were planting shrubs on the banks of Duck Bay

If you live in Nelson, chances are you’ve walked by it countless times without even realizing it’s called Duck Bay.

It’s that pretty inlet between the Lakeside soccer fields and Chahko Mika Mall, not far from where Obsidian the derelict pirate ship lays half-sunk and kayakers weave through bobbing sailboats on sunny days. There’s Denis Kleine’s Osprey and Nest bronze sculpture fixed atop a pole jutting out of the water, and marshy wetland at the base of its rocky beach.

And as of last Thursday there’s now an educational welcome sign created by Wildflower students that celebrates the area’s ecological significance, and plenty of new plant life along the shoreline.

Judging by the frequency of avian visits to the area, it’s aptly named.

The sign’s unveiling coincided with an ambitious restoration project that saw kids planting four species and 22 native plants alongside representatives from Wildsight, Friends of Kootenay Lake Stewardship Society and Central Kootenay Invasive Species Society as part of the Know Your Watershed program.

“The program, administered and delivered by Wildsight, supports students in learning where their water comes from, how it is used and affected as it moves through their community, and what happens to it after they have used it,” Kat McGlynn told the Star.

“Through classroom visits and a full-day field trip, students develop an understanding of what a watershed is, and how we are all connected by water in the Columbia Basin.”

As part of the program, the kids were asked to come up with an action project. They chose Duck Bay. They’ve also come up with an ongoing scientific study of water runoff.

During the excursion the students were accompanied by Claire de la Salle and Raegan Mallinsen, who both offered expertise on efforts to monitor and conserve water quality in Kootenay Lake. They emphasized the value of wetlands that provide habitat for many important species of flora and fauna.

The permanent sign was created with the assistance of local artist and graphic designer Catherine McIntosh. It includes wetland information that was researched, written and edited by students.

Just Posted

Voters pack Nelson mayoral forum

Candidates answered questions from journalist Glenn Hicks

EDITORIAL: Nelson mayor’s race uninspiring

An incumbent mayor, a former mayor and a clown walk into a forum

Nelson downtown holiday lighting by mid November, city says

But for this year, only on the 400 block of Baker Street

COLUMN: What Wayne Stetski did on his summer vacation

The Kootenay-Columbia MP talks cimate change, farmers markets and Bill C-281

Provincial energy incentives complement Nelson’s EcoSave program

B.C. offers homeowners new financial incentives for energy retrofits

VIDEO: Drag story time a hit at Kootenay Kids

The childcare centre invited a local performer to read to its kids

BREAKING: Prince Harry and Meghan expecting their 1st child in spring

The announcement of the pregnancy confirms weeks of speculation from royal watchers

Enbridge to begin building road to access pipeline explosion site in B.C.

An explosion Tuesday knocked out a 91-centimetre line

East Kootenay waterway under the microscope

Wildsight, Sierra Club BC, Headwaters Montana and U.S. university launch water sampling program

Andrew Scheer on revamped NAFTA deal: ‘I would have signed a better one’

Conservative leader says he wouldn’t have signed USMCA

Matheson will have NHL hearing after Canucks rookie Pettersson hit

The 19-year-old Swedish centre appeared woozy after the hit

GUEST COLUMN: A better way to manage B.C.’s public construction

Claire Trevena responds to Andrew Wilkinson on NDP union policy

B.C. brewery creates bread beer from food waste

The brew aims to raise food waste awareness and provide funds for the food bank

Dad files Charter challenge after B.C. bans kids from taking transit unsupervised

Adrian Crook is taking his fight to B.C. Supreme Court

Most Read