Greyhound patrons wait for buses in the former Baker Street location of the depot in 1952. Photo courtesy of Touchstones Nelson

Greyhound patrons wait for buses in the former Baker Street location of the depot in 1952. Photo courtesy of Touchstones Nelson

YEAR IN REVIEW: Greyhound departs Nelson

Our No. 5 story of 2018

Eighty-nine years of Greyhound service through Nelson ended in October.

The last Greyhound bus left Nelson on Oct. 27, four days before the service was permanently shut down in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and all but one B.C. route.

Greyhound Canada got its start in the Kootenays as a bus line run by Johnny Learmonth in the 1920s before it was bought and incorporated as Canadian Greyhound Coaches in 1929. It began running daily trips from Nelson to Calgary in 1931.

“I can’t think of a business that started in Nelson that has touched more people than Greyhound Canada,” said Touchstones Nelson collections manager Jean-Philippe Stienne.

In February, the Passenger Transportation Board ruled Greyhound could cut several routes throughout B.C., including the route through Nelson, to four trips per week. Prior to that, buses ran east and west through Nelson twice a day, seven days a week.

That turned out to be a step toward complete closure.

The company announced in July it was scrapping passenger and freight delivery services altogether because of a 41 per cent decline in national ridership since 2010.

The loss of Greyhound has left many residents and businesses in need of alternate transportation options.

Phil Mader, 69, said he was relying on Greyhound to see a doctor in Kelowna about his failing liver.

“It’s not such a big thing if it’s for going to Kelowna for a basketball game, but when it comes to an urgent medical appointment or surgery and you don’t have a car, it has consequences,” said Mader.

Although the depot was scheduled to close Oct. 31, Greyhound opted instead to close down Nelson’s route four days early.

Gloria Clark, who ran the Nelson and Creston depots for a decade, criticized the company for not notifying its customers ahead of time about the change.

When the Star visited the depot to speak with Clark, she was trying to help a woman who had pre-booked a trip only to find out Greyhound no longer existed.

“I think what was inefficient was [not] contacting the customers who pre-book — and many do now, especially seniors, because you get a better ticket price,” said Clark.

Bus service stills exists for residents, albeit on a much smaller scale. The same week Greyhound shut down, Silver City Stage Lines began roundtrip operations from Nelson to Kelowna from Sunday to Friday.

Related:

Greyhound bus service closes in Nelson

Touchstones museum receives Greyhound memorabilia

Uncertainty on Greyhound cuts leaves residents in the dark



tyler.harper@nelsonstar.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

YEAR 2018

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A rainbow shining on Kelowna General Hospital on May 12, 2020 International Nurses Day. (Steve Wensley - Prime Light Media)
New COVID cases trending down in Interior Health

24 new cases reported Thursday, Feb. 25, death at Kelowna General Hospital

Sylvain Fabi, Canada’s chief negotiator for the Columbia River Treaty, joined a number of government and Indigenous government stakeholders for a virtual town hall on Feb. 24, 2021, to update the state of the Columbia River Treaty negotiations. Trevor Crawley photo/Zoom screenshot
Indigenous input key to Columbia River Treaty negotiations

Ecosystem function included in negotiations along with flood management and power generation priorities

Shayna Jones. Photo: Louis Bockner
Kaslo performer collects stories of Black rural experience

Shayna Jones will create a performance piece about Black people ‘tucked away in the countryside’

The Feb. 25, 2021 edition of the Nelson Star might be a little late getting to your door. File photo
Snow delays latest Nelson Star issue

We are done with the white stuff

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature. (B.C. government)
B.C. reports 10 additional deaths, 395 new COVID-19 cases

The majority of new coronavirus infections were in the Fraser Health region

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

A new survey has found that virtual visits are British Columbian’s preferred way to see the doctor amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (Unsplash)
Majority of British Columbians now prefer routine virtual doctor’s visits: study

More than 82% feel virtual health options reduce wait times, 64% think they lead to better health

Captain and Maria, a pair of big and affectionate akbash dogs, must be adopted together because they are so closely bonded. (SPCA image)
Shuswap SPCA seeks forever home for inseparable Akbash dogs

A fundraiser to help medical expenses for Captain and Maria earned over 10 times its goal

The missing camper heard a GSAR helicopter, and ran from his tree well waving his arms. File photo
Man trapped on Manning mountain did nearly everything right to survive: SAR

The winter experienced camper was overwhelmed by snow conditions

Cory Mills, Eric Blackmore and A.J. Jensen, all 20, drown in the Sooke River in February 2020. (Contributed photos)
Coroner confirms ‘puddle jumping’ in 2020 drowning deaths of 3 B.C. men

Cory Mills, Eric Blackmore and A.J. Jensen pulled into raging river driving through nearby flooding

Ashley Paxman, 29, is in the ICU after being struck by a vehicle along Highway 97 Feb. 18, 2021. She remains in critical condition. (GoFundMe)
Okanagan woman in ICU with broken bones in face after being struck by car

She remains in serious condition following Feb. 18 incident

Vancouver International Women in Film Festival kicks off March 5.
Women in Film Festival features two B.C. filmmakers

The 16th annual festival kicks off March 5, 2021

The booklet roots present day activism in the history of racist policies, arguing the history must be acknowledged in order to change. (CCPA)
New resource dives into 150 years of racist policy in B.C.

Racist history must be acknowledged in order to change, authors say

Most Read