Capacity to go through cement

I recently learned that Telus is in the process of installing new microwave-transmitting cell towers throughout the West Kootenay

I recently learned that Telus is in the process of installing new microwave-transmitting cell towers throughout the West Kootenay, including where I live near Ymir. With current scientific research showing without doubt that there are potential health risks to humans, animals and other life forms from microwave radiation emitted from these towers, it is astonishing that Telus would even consider such expansion (bioinitiative.org).

Telus would have us believe that these new towers are necessary so that cell phone coverage can include more areas. This is not true; if it were then transmitters in the 1G or 2G range would suffice. Telus is preparing to install the new 4G transmitters that will send the radiation over several kilometres and the new signal will have the capacity to go through cement and other materials — it is all about selling their products to an unsuspecting clientele. Devastation to local wildlife including pollinators could follow soon after the erection of powerful microwave transmitters in the 4G range. (citizensforsafetechnology.org/wildlife-and-environment).

There are two important issues to Telus’ proliferation of microwave transmitters in our area. One is the potential health risks to humans and the natural environment. Science has shown that it cannot be ruled out that the decline in bees and other pollinators is a direct result of the electromagnetic radiation beaconed from all microwave towers.

The second issue is with political control. Perhaps it is time that the citizens of the West Kootenays get a say in just how much radiation we want to be exposed to. Since the onslaught of wireless technology, citizens have been kept out of the discussion and in the dark as to the potential health risks from this radiation. Local politicians who do support a pre-cautionary principle have been overruled by Telus and other multi-national corporations. In the meantime we have seen a constant decline in our natural environment and a dramatic increase in certain cancers and chronic diseases. With all the independently funded scientific studies showing potential harm from microwave radiation, we cannot rule out that the signals that now surround us on a daily basis from cellular towers are a potential health risk.

There are alternatives to cell towers. Fiber optic broadband technology is a viable and healthier alternative. We can still make technological progress without compromising our health and the health of vital elements of our environment — humanity, plants, animals, pollinating insects like the honeybee and the fabric of life itself are at stake.

Josh Currie

 

Ymir

 

 

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