EDITORIAL: Parents’ dilemma

The ongoing labour strife between the province and its teachers has basically put the students’ futures on hold.

What’s a parent to do? School is supposed to begin in six days. Normally that means kids are running around trying to enjoy their last few days of freedom as parents buy back to school clothes and supplies, all the while  dreaming of more peaceful times ahead.

But this year things are different.

The ongoing labour strife between the province and its teachers has basically put the students’ futures on hold.

A recent meeting held by the L.V. Rogers Secondary parents’ advisory committee helped illustrate the dilemma most parents and students find themselves in.

If the unthinkable happens and an agreement is reached in time, will schools be able to open on September 2? Will the classrooms be ready? Will the teachers be prepared?

How much time is needed to return to normal? What about the atmosphere?

Will students be entering a hostile work environment once labour peace is finally reached?

If the work stoppage goes into September, how will the learning time be made up?

These were all good questions, with few answers available. So much will depend on what’s negotiated that it is almost impossible for management, or teachers, to answer those questions.

One thing is known, students in Grades 11 and 12 who need to make changes to their upcoming class schedules can contact the school. The principal is handling those requests as the lockout continues.

Of course, having your timetable corrected may prove fruitless if there is no school to go to.

Bargaining has to be ramped up if there is any hope to return to normality. Students — and everyone else involved — need that stability.

Get it solved!

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