EDITORIAL: You’ve got mail

Statistics have shown that the standard mail process (now unflatteringly nicknamed snail mail) has been rapidly declining.

A recent decision by Canada Post to phase out its home delivery service in favour of community mail boxes has some groups up in arms and even shocked by the announcement.

But when you step back and look at  the situation on the whole, the writing has been on the wall for years.

Statistics have shown that the standard mail process (now unflatteringly nicknamed snail mail) has been rapidly declining.

The art of the written word has been quickly replaced by the typed word.

In the Internet age, people have the opportunity to communicate with each other all over the world, without having to place their messages in envelopes and sending them off.

Email, Facebook and Twitter have made the “personal letter” all but obsolete.

And more and more utility companies, credit cards or other billing agencies are turning to email invoices and bills, rather than leaving a messy and expensive paper trail.

It is more efficient, less costly and even environmentally friendly.

However, Canada Post’s announcement still seems a little extreme considering the other options available.

Rather than completely ending its home delivery system, which caters to about five million homes at this point, a reduction in delivery would seem like a better first step.

Why not deliver the mail three times a week, then eventually downgrade to once a week.

That way seniors, or others who have difficulty moving, could still receive their mail at home without the stress or inconvenience of arranging transportation to the proposed community mailboxes.

That would also ensure that the people receive their mail at least once a week. The community mail box may sound like a good idea, but if some people avoid going there, or just can’t get there, then what could be their only line of communication is being cut.

Surprising as it may seem, not everyone is web savvy, or has the funds to afford a computer. Of course, with another increase in the cost of stamps, they will soon be unaffordable as well.

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