Enbridge gathering only raises tensions

Two years ago I registered to speak at the Enbridge Gateway pipeline inquisition regarding communist China’s desire for Canada’s resources.

Two years ago I registered to speak at the Enbridge Gateway pipeline inquisition regarding communist China’s desire for Canada’s resources.

This year, on the morning of January 28, a bus load of Kootenay folk arrived in Kelowna to the prayers of song and dance with 40 or so Okanagan/Shuswap Indians with twice that many rallying outside the convention centre.

The inquisitors restricted public access to the public hearings for good reason; they are frightened. They know they are provoking serious unrest with western Canada’s non-treaty natives.

These Indians have the legal right to protect creation from wonton industrial destruction. They also have growing support from many Canadians of all races.

Canada’s Conservative government appears caught off guard by the united native resistance to Alberta’s efforts to pollute Earth.

After two years, when I finally get before the panel of three Canadians to read my ten minute opinion about a pipeline from Alberta to China, they cut off my microphone because my words inspired people to peaceful resolve against the global cabal of fools that are confused by a peaceful planet.Alberta’s dirty tar boom may have peaked. The tar must be 20 to 40 per cent discounted against benchmark Texas sweet crude. Current and near futures for natural gas and heavy tar oil stuck in the middle Canada, behind 60 or so Indian tribes ready to go the legal wall; combined with a native youth movement that idles less makes for sober second thought when Canadians consider a pipeline proposal that compromises political/ecological sanity.

Tom Prior

Nelson