Food trucks don’t get a free ride in Kootenays

Wanting to open our own business where we could be creative and still make time for our family was a dream for my husband.

Re: “The cart before the council,” January 25

Wanting to open our own business where we could be creative and still make time for our family was a dream for my husband.

After looking at many different communities and the available store frontage within our price range it became very clear to us that our dreams were bigger than our budget. Creating the food truck was the only affordable way for us to make  that dream a reality.

Respecting the challenges that brick-and-mortar restaurants face, the food truck industry is not without its own challenges. This industry runs on a limited timeframe, unless weather permits longer seasons and contrary to the idea we can just “pop up” where ever we feel is not at all the case. There are bylaws created, and respectfully so to keep this from happening. There are other fees that the general public does not relate to operating food trucks if they are not familiar with this type of operation: insurance on the vehicle, rental space for food storage, lot rental fees, etc.

The one thing that makes this type of business, and any brick-and-mortar establishment successful, is the quality of your product and the love and care you put into that product for your guests. We truly believe that the success of any free enterprise is your product. If there is one or 100 food trucks, the measurement of its success is how good is your grub?

We firmly believe there is a place in every community for vendors of all types, all creations. We truly hope to see more food trucks from Food Cart USA pop up in the area. They are a great company and this is a great industry to be a part of. It’s a fantastic culture for this day and age. We would love to see food cart festivals and events.

Keep this area colourful and creative!

Blair and Jennifer Peel

Owners of Confusion Taco

Salmo