Let’s hear it for the trees

Nelson’s canopy is a gift. Mother Nature and our city’s forefathers have combined to grant us four-season splendor. Whether it’s strolling at street level or gazing from the vantage of the Gyro bluffs, it’s a little bit of extra pop that helps distinguish this community from the rest.

Nelson’s canopy is a gift. Mother Nature and our city’s forefathers have combined to grant us four-season splendor. Whether it’s strolling at street level or gazing from the vantage of the Gyro bluffs, it’s a little bit of extra pop that helps distinguish this community from the rest.

On Sunday the canopy was trimmed. Four less trees in the downtown foliage tunnel. It was a sad, but necessary move.

The linden trees that were converted to firewood have long been the suspected source of a foul summer stench in the 600 block of Baker Street. It’s believed the horrible smell of vomit that could easily ruin a summer day originated from those four trees.

Business owners in the area and the city tried different measures to deal with the stink. Specialists were called in, an army of ladybugs was released, the area was scoured to ensure the odour did not originate from elsewhere… nothing. Though not 100 per cent sure the linden trees were the source of the foul fragrance, the difficult decision to fire up the chainsaws was made.

It’s still too early to tell whether the public will be upset with the removal. Recent history indicates there might be some uproar. Other barked landmarks have been removed in the downtown and vigils have been held. The threat of the axe for the famed doughnut tree in Uphill provided weeks of headlines a few years back.

Drive down the street this week and you will certainly notice the streetscape void. Who knew there buildings behind the foliage? But just like moving a piece of furniture in your living room, soon we will get used to the new look.

Trees are not forever features. They have a lifespan and sometimes their imperfections require an early demise. In this case the linden trees had to go and give the city credit for doing all it could to ensure it was the last option on the table.

 

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