Randolph Seibold (centre) is one of a group of cold-water enthusiasts in Nelson. Photo: Tyler Harper

Randolph Seibold (centre) is one of a group of cold-water enthusiasts in Nelson. Photo: Tyler Harper

LETTER: Allow me to explain

From reader Randolph Seibold

Re:Taking the plunge with Nelson’s cold-water enthusiasts” published Jan. 24

I read with much interest the recent story regarding the local “cold-enthusiast” group, immersing themselves in the mid-winter waters of beautiful Kootenay Lake on a regular basis. Being one of the group, my words were quoted in the story, and I wanted to provide some further clarity.

When I stated harshly that I “loathe soft, complacent Western culture…”, it should come with a big caveat. I’m not better than that culture, I’m a part of it. I probably take for granted, far too often, the wealth and convenience that supports me daily. I’m excited and inspired by the revelation of cold immersion, but I’m also addicted to hot showers, hot coffee, and driving, still.

Though I love humanity, I loathe what we’ve become, as a species. How our constant thirst for more warmth, more convenience, more technology, has literally started burning our global environment to the ground. It’s a situation that I deal with on a daily basis as a renewable energy consultant, but I’m still very aware that as I strive to be part of the solution, I’m still part of the problem. But, a huge part of the current societal and environmental challenge is the self-righteous and defensive in-fighting between human beings. It’s maybe the single biggest thing that’s derailing our hopes of survival.

Coming to the cold water, in a humble way, and being almost “reborn” each time, has been a powerful path to insight for me. But I wanted to share honestly with the readers the full context of my comment, to acknowledge my hypocrisy. And also, if I may, to connect the healthy experience of cold water immersion to the greater need that exists for human awakening and resilience, and humility, if we are to have any hope of emerging from our self-made crises, a better person.

Randolph Seibold

Nelson