LETTER: Consider Green plan to reduce fossil fuel consumption

From reader Andy Shadrack

Canadian voters have a choice to make in the October federal election, a decision that will affect the future of generations to come like no previous election. Currently the Trudeau Liberal government’s carbon tax, the one being opposed by Scheer, Kenney, Ford et al, will collect $2.36 billion in 2019-20, with 90 per cent of that being returned to taxpayers.

Meanwhile the International Monetary Fund has calculated that in 2017 alone $53 trillion was handed out in taxpayer subsidies and rebates to all oil and gas companies globally — $43 billion in Canada. Before you vote in October, consider what a Canadian government could do to enhance health care, seniors care, daycare, even initiate a just transition for laid off fossil fuel workers with that $43 billion.

Remember, voting Liberal means increasing those subsidies, such as the $275 million just given to LNG Canada by Finance Minister Bill Morneau in Kitimat. Likewise BC Liberal, Alberta Conservative and Alberta/B.C. NDP governments have all been bending over backwards to ramp up taxpayer subsidies and rebates so we can increase, rather than reduce, fossil fuel extraction and production.

Only the Green Party of Canada and Elizabeth May, with her experience in the negotiation of the Montreal Protocol in 1987 that eliminated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) to protect the ozone layer, have created a comprehensive plan to reduce fossil fuel consumption in Canada.

Before you vote, compare Mission Possible with the policies from the Conservative, NDP and Liberal parties. Then remember that Elizabeth May was in the House Commons during the debate and passing of the emergency climate change resolution. Where, you need to ask, were the prime minister, leader of the official opposition and leader of the NDP? What was of such importance that they could not participate in this discussion and vote on this crucial issue?

Andy Shadrack

Kaslo

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