LETTER: Food security in Nelson

"West Kootenay folk are dreaming in colour to think we would have food security while our near neighbours are not."

Re: Food security in Nelson

The recent “Food Security Asset Mapping and Gap Analysis” study financed by the city of Nelson and Nelson Food Cupboard Society to date has not addressed our destruction of wild foods that sustained tens of thousands of humans for thousands of years until a genocidal gold/silver based religious/economic order arrived.

Real food security is political/religious sanity. West Kootenay folk are dreaming in colour to think we would have food security while our near neighbours are not. They would demand at gun point if their food supply is threatened and ours is secure. This is the very basic order of the dominant current human psyche.

It is not to suggest that the food security consultants hired are not sincere and well intentioned; it is just difficult to believe that the European pilgrim corporate structures that run our planet and fair city, can do anything but destroy local food security. This paradigm favours monied religions and political forms they have schooled into existence.

It was paramount for early European settlers to destroy vast herds of bison, caribou and huge schools of wild fish, in favour of a domestic slow golden cow and caged salmon.

Feeding our current population here in the West Kootenay is a piece of cake; if we don’t continue to look the other way when corporate municipal, provincial and federal political elite want to flood or industrialize, wilderness and agricultural lands that can produce venison and beef, as is currently wanting to happen on the Peace River and Jumbo resort. Those that are concerned for local food security should help stop the Site C dam. It is far from a done deal. The Site C reservoir will also increase the pine beetle problem, as the standing water will cause the winter temperature to increase.

Our best chance at a foreseeable food security is not continuing to poison the world around us.

Tom Prior

Nelson

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