LETTER: Forest stewardship plan raises concerns about 49 Creek

Reader Mike Devine is concerned about the effects of logging on the Blewett water supply.

With regards to Kalesnikoff’s upcoming forest stewardship plan No. 597, I have two concerns, one general and the other specific.

My general concern is that lumber companies in this area are running out of suitable timber and with that will come more pressure to log into areas that were previously considered unfeasible due to lack of suitable profit and environmental considerations, and to log using archaic practices such as clearcutting which have been abandoned by many European countries in favour of more sustainable and less catastrophic methods.

There seems to be no legal means of preventing this. The companies are able to establish plans with the aid of their hired consultants doing environmental impact studies and these are presented for public comment after the Ministry of Forests has stamped its approval. This is a classic case of the fox guarding the hen house.

My specific concern relates to logging on 49 Creek. During the past two years Kalesnikoff has proceeded to harvest two blocks on 49 Creek. That they would cut on such slopes is shocking to anyone viewing from the road and really does defy common sense. The foreseeable problems here are not only with slope stability but more importantly with water catchment and retention.

My fear is that these cuts will continue down the creek in the future. There is valuable timber there but there is a more valuable resource that’s being tampered with and that is water.

Current concerns regarding future water supplies are widespread particularly with residents in the Blewett area who lost their wells last summer. Recent articles and letters in the Nelson Star have focused on the City of Nelson’s water problems and the need to establish more sources than they have at present.

With the growth in the city and the area of Blewett it is reasonable that the water of 49 Creek could become extremely valuable in the near future. Simply stated, why tamper with such an established source of this essential resource?

Mike Devine

Director

Blewett Conservation Society

Just Posted

NDP bring Green New Deal to the Kootenays

MPs Wayne Stetski and Peter Julian held climate change talks in Nelson, Cranbrook and Revelstoke

Activist, author Libby Davies coming to Nelson

Davies will talk about the intersection of activism and politics in pursuit of social change

LETTER: An alternate view of colonialism

From reader Charles Jeanes

B.C. sockeye returns drop as official calls 2019 ‘extremely challenging’

Federal government says officials are seeing the same thing off Alaska and Washington state

Expanded support to help B.C. youth from care attend university still falling short

Inadequate support, limited awareness and eligibility restrictions some of the existing challenges

Ethnic media aim to help maintain boost in voting by new Canadians

Statistics Canada says new Canadians made up about one-fifth of the voting population in 2016

Cross-examination begins for B.C. dad accused of killing young daughters

Andrew Berry is charged in the deaths of six-year-old Chloe and four-year-old Aubrey in 2017

Dog attacked by river otters, Penticton owner says

Marie Fletcher says her dog was pulled underwater by four river otters in the Penticton Channel

BC SPCA overwhelmed with cats, kittens needing homes

Large number of cruelty investigations, plus normal ‘kitten season’ to blame

B.C. Hydro applies for rare cut in electricity rates next year

Province wrote off $1.1 billion debt to help reverse rate increase

Speculation tax forces sale of Greater Victoria’s iconic ‘Tulip House’

Bob and Jan Fleming selling their retirement home famous for its thousands of tulips

Most Read