LETTER: Improve public health with clean energy

Recently in the United States, nearly 200 concerned and committed physicians, nurses and public health professionals from came together.

Recently in the United States, nearly 200 concerned and committed physicians, nurses and public health professionals from across the country came together in Washington, DC for an intensive, two-day, action-oriented Climate Health Summit.

Beyond the latest research and data findings on the increasing threats to health posed by climate change, many doctors spoke out from personal experience. One allergist told of epidemic asthma and the contribution of climate change of rising pollen counts, mold from flooding and humidity, and ozone levels exacerbating disease, all of which have impacted her patients. Dr Lynn Ringenberg, president of Physicians for Social Responsibility, spoke on infectious diseases that will increase with climate change and which are especially concerning for her patient population: children.

The summit also made clear how burning fossil fuels is bad for our health, and how reducing the burning of coal, natural gas, and the fuel in combustion engines and switching to clean energy could immediately improve public health.

Marylee Banyard, Nelson