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LETTER: On the eve of Remembrance Day

From reader John Kemp

In mid-June, the Nelson Sea Cadets celebrated their 75th Annual Ceremonial Review. Throughout the general salute, inspection and awards presentation, every cadet or officer called up before his or her superior would salute and announce themselves as a member of the Royal Canadian Sea Cadets, then say Hampton Gray V.C.

Indeed, the symbol of the corps with its ships, circle of rope and a wreath around a cross has only one thing written upon it: Hampton Gray V.C. Each naval cap shows the name most prominent.

Gray was of course a native son of this city. The sea cadets have two other reasons to honour him so. First, he was a naval pilot and flew from an aircraft carrier. Second, he followed his training without fail to the end. For the cadets, there cannot be a better example of dedication.

On Remembrance Day, as much as we abhor war, we should remember those who served. There will be a sea cadet in the city’s parade and Gray’s name will be found a few places on that uniform, a symbol for all who were lost.

John Kemp

Balfour