LETTER: Removing Duncan Dam would help kokanee

I am not confident that measures to restore kokanee stocks in Kootenay Lake will do the trick.

Re: “Province moving forward on kokanee recovery plan”

I was glad to read the story in regard to the province’s plan to restore the kokanee stocks in Kootenay Lake, but I am not confident that the measures they talked about will do the trick.

According to biologists, there are too many predators in the lake and not enough prey. They are definitely right about the prey. Kokanee spawning numbers in the Meadow Creek spawning channel have fallen from 500,000 five years ago to 10,000 last year. That is not just a precipitous drop, it is bordering on extinction. I do not agree that there are too many predators. I think if that was true, we would be seeing huge catches of skinny trout, easily caught, and to my knowledge this is not the case.

The article goes on to list what is seen as the solution, and part of that plan includes nutrient addition. In other words, pouring the Elephant brand fertilizer into it. This is definitely good for Teck, as it is a mighty big garden patch to fertilize, but what if the addition of this smelter byproduct is a big part of the problem?

There is a dam upstream of the north end of the lake that generates not one bit of electricity. Its only function is to store water for later generation. As a byproduct it also helps somewhat with flood control. The downside is that it stops the natural nutrient flow, and prevents the fish from reaching their natural spawning grounds.

If we were really serious about taking a step to restore Kootenay Lake to its former glory we would be talking about taking out this useless obstruction. But BC Hydro would never allow it. They are in the business of making money, not the business of repairing the damage they have already done and continue to do to the environment.

Rod Retzlaff, Glade

 

Just Posted

Avalanche Canada issues special public warning

Very weak layer buried under recent snow a cause for concern

KBRH on watch for bed bugs after two recent cases

Spokesperson Mandy Lowery says there has not been a bed bug sighting at KBRH since Dec. 8

Coffee card donations return at Wait’s News

The program supplied over 200 cards last year

Trafalgar students build home for sanctuary horse

Grade 8 students collaborated on a project with a local farm sanctuary

Nelson won’t restrict parking amnesty to West Kootenay

So far, more than 800 people have responded with amnesty payments

Trudeau to make it harder for future PM to reverse Senate reforms

Of the 105 current senators, 54 are now independents who have banded together in Independent Senators’ Group

21 detained before Paris protests as police deploy in force

There was a strong police presence outside the central Saint Lazare train station, where police in riot gear checked bags

Media, robotics, Indigenous studies coming to B.C. Grade 12 classrooms in 2019-20

Provincial tests are also being changed for students in Grade 10 to 12, the Education Ministry said

ICBC to apply for 6.3% hike to basic insurance rates

Crown Corporation said it will be submitting its next basic rate application to the British Columbia Utilities Commission Friday

Stranded B.C. trucker writes final wishes before being rescued 3 days later

‘I was just praying someone would come along’

Canfor Corp. extending temporary curtailment of sawmills in B.C.; cutting hours

Vancouver-based company says the decision is due to declining lumber prices, high log costs and log supply constraints

Canada’s prospective world junior team members await final roster decisions

Thirty-four players were invited to the national junior selection camp

Final phase of Kelowna hospital cardiac centre completed

Finishing new recovery rooms marks completion of $381 million project

Family searching for B.C. professor last seen at Colombian salsa club

Ramazan Gencay, a professor in economics at Simon Fraser University, was last seen in Medellin

Most Read