LETTER: Right-to-life ad was satirical

Why is the harm a smoking, drinking woman might do to her unborn child upsetting, but the harm an abortion does not considered upsetting?

Re: “Right-to-life ad disappointing,” Letters, Feb. 3

In response to Morgan Barton’s unspecified complaints regarding our ad, why is it the harm a smoking, drinking woman might do to her unborn child is upsetting, but the exceedingly painful lethal harm an abortion does to her unborn child is not considered upsetting? How can a woman insist that her body not be treated as a piece of property, yet she can turn around and treat her child as a piece of property to be disposed of as she sees fit?

For all those who missed the satirical nature of the ad, of course a woman should not smoke and drink at any stage of pregnancy. Thank you for your concern for the welfare and human rights of the unborn child.

For all those who have difficulty seeing an unborn child exposed to cigarette smoke and alcohol, but are okay with the child being aborted, Canadian statistics show 605 late-term abortions were performed in one year on viable babies, plus another 4,710 abortions on babies with an unrecorded gestational age; plus another 22,262 unreported abortions. In 2009, 67 babies survived an abortion and were left to die, some taking as long as six hours (BC coroners report). Some of these occurred at BC Women’s Hospital.

Hospitals claim these late-term abortions are only performed on babies with genetic anomalies or where the mother’s life is at risk. In a BC Report article, a nurse said these genetic anomaly abortions have suddenly increased from maybe once a month to twice a week. One has only to look at the hospital protocol applied to Ximena Renaerts to determine the truth. After a failed abortion in Washington, she was born at Vancouver General Hospital weighing three pounds, equivalent to a month pregnancy.

Because she was supposed to be aborted, she was placed in a closet and left to die. Lack of oxygen and hypothermia caused her to suffer brain damage before she was finally treated. Ximena is now a quadriplegic with the mental capacity of a three year old. Her adoptive parents were awarded a financial settlement, but the seven doctors and nurses involved have never been charged or had their licenses revoked.

A 2013 National Post article reported similar cases at other Canadian hospitals. In response, doctors are looking for a better way to kill the child within the womb during late-term abortions or hoping the law will allow them to not report the children who survive abortion.

Why are you not weeping for these poor little children?

Dawn and Rick Rodman, Nelson Right-To-Life

 

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