Nelson Memorial Park is home to more than 11,000 graves. Photo submitted

LETTER: Speaking up for green burials

From Nancy Radonich of the Nelson End of Life Society

The Nelson End of Life Society is advocating for environmentally friendly burials in our cemetery. And from the response we have received, the residents of Nelson are behind the cause.

With the majority of our community committed to sustainability and green living practices, it is imperative to provide a green burial option. This incentive protects and preserves the environment and the natural cycles occurring in it.

Cremation is typically considered the most cost effective and simplest option, but the real cost to the environment is rarely factored in. The estimated energy required to cremate one body could drive a car for 7,700 km. Additionally, lead and mercury toxins along with greenhouse gases are expelled into the air.

Green (or natural) burials forgo the use of chemicals. The deceased is laid to rest without embalming in a grave with no reinforced cement or fibreglass liners. Caskets are made from natural fibers such as untreated wood, wicker or a cloth shroud. With the planting of Indigenous trees and shrubs, the remains of the deceased are part of the natural life cycle.

The society will be making a second presentation to city council on Dec 16.

For more information about green burials and the Nelson End of Life Society please visit nelsociety.org or our Facebook page.

Nancy Radonich

Nelson

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