LETTER: Stetski’s record as mayor deserves criticism

Reader Igor Gallyamov: "He sadly neglected major issues such as roads and infrastructure..."

So NDP candidate Wayne Stetski wants change. Well let’s look at what change meant to the citizens of Cranbrook when they voted for change almost four years ago and elected Stetski as their mayor. After three years as mayor, in the 2014 election he received only seven more votes than in the 2011 election: 2,185 to 2,192. He was soundly defeated.

In fact, five of the newly-elected councillors also received more votes than Wayne did running for mayor. It seems the citizens of Cranbrook were tired of Mr. Stetski and wanted a change. At the ballot box they made their point loud and clear. Wayne Stetski must go.

As mayor, Stetski raised taxes over 12 per cent and raised utility rates 10 per cent. He sadly neglected major issues such as roads and infrastructure and the problem with Idlewild Dam, while squandering taxpayers’ dollars on frivolous projects. Stetski alienated himself from the business community, resulting in barriers to business and very little economic growth and activity.

Under his miserable leadership, every one of his councillors who ran in the 2014 election was also soundly defeated. Not much success in leadership and direction shown there. His claim to fame was attending over 300 events a year. Many of these had nothing to do with running of the city’s affairs. I suggest Wayne Stetski should have paid more attention to what the citizens of Cranbrook wanted and less attention to his photo ops.

Wayne Stetski as mayor proved to be a prime example of poor performance, poor leadership, and no results. Is this the person you want representing you in Ottawa? Think about this when you are voting for change because as evidenced during his term in Cranbrook, you will absolutely get less than you bargained for!

Igor Gallyamov

Cranbrook

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