LETTER: Think before posting

Someone else commented on the status saying how tragic it is that only good people die young.

This is a public notice: Don’t eat yellow snow, don’t text and drive, and use your head before you post on Facebook.

Picture this; it’s a breezy summer morning, the sun is out, the birds are chirping and you’re sitting at the table enjoying a delicious cup of coffee.

You still have 10 minutes before having to leave for work and decide to take a quick scroll through Facebook. The page loads and the first status catches your eye, a friend is asking if anyone has heard about the “incident” that happened in town.

Weird, you haven’t heard of any incident.

Someone else commented on the status saying how tragic it is that only good people die young.

You scratch your head and frown, wondering what happened all while mentally agreeing that it truly is tragic.

You scroll down and see another status “Has anyone heard about the girl who died this morning?”

You click it and the comments say that she is a young girl, 24, from the next town over. The next comment is correcting the previous “actually she’s only 22, I went to school with her.”

Your stomach turns, you know quite a few people that age from that city. You continue to scroll through the page and see, “RIP Jane.” Jane?

It couldn’t be your Jane, could it? You click on your mutual friends with the status owner, and that’s when your world crumbles.

Could you imagine learning that something tragic has happened to a loved one from a Facebook status?

People should not be posting about these events that come up until names and details have been officially released in the news. Not only are these statuses and comments extremely insensitive and disrespectful to those involved and related, they also cause rumors and gossip. Which in some cases can be even more distressing, especially if what was said turns out to be untrue.

I would like to ask all of my Facebook friends to please take a second and think, “What am I gaining by posting this? How will this affect the people reading it?”

Do it out of respect for the family and friends of those involved in the incident.

Private message, text, or call each other but keep it off your wall. Soon enough it will all be in the news. What you do with that, after it is made public, is your business.

That being said; visit a little longer, hug a little tighter, and remember to say I love you every chance you get.

Life is short and you never know what moment with someone will be your last.

 

Danica Philipzyk

Just Posted

Nelson firefighter wage negotiations in year six

Firefighting is an essential service, so strikes are illegal

EcoSociety asks city to become 100 per cent renewable

The plan would have Nelson ditch fossil fuels by 2050

Finding support at Community Connect

The 10th annual event offered free services, clothing and food on Saturday

RDCK calls for reversal of Sinixt extinction

The board opposed a land transfer to the Westbank First Nation this week

Nelson city council to update banner policy

Council will revisit the wording of the policy at its December meeting

RDCK holds open house on proposed boat launch

RDCK hosted an open house at Blewett Elementary to discuss plans for a boat launch at Taghum Beach

LVR Bombers volleyball team off to provincials

The senior girls’ squad secured a spot with a win over Trail last week

Winter kicks off in Nelson

Over 30 events are set to celebrate the snowy season

Man pleads guilty to Leafs recycling depot theft

Dezmond Waggoner had been charged with theft over $5,000

Education minister blasts Chilliwack school trustee on gender issues

Fleming calls Neufeld’s behaviour ‘shameful’ and ‘unacceptable’

Most Read