LETTERS: Anti-pipeline hypocrisy

I was walking through the street market when someone I knew from the past came up and asked me to sign the anti-pipeline petition.

On Friday evening I was walking through the street market when someone I knew from the past came up and asked me to sign the anti-pipeline petition.

I was surprised because when I knew this person years ago he had an abundance of common sense, which seems to have evaporated in the intervening years.

If I was in the mood I might have asked “Which pipeline?” because there is the Northern Gateway, Kinder Morgan, Keystone XL and the proposed Alberta east.

I worked on the Yellowhead Highway and did preliminary work on the Coquihalla Highway in the 1970s, and we had to work around the KM pipeline. They even helped out by allowing our staff to hitch rides on their patrol helicopter.

If anti-pipeline people are so opposed to pipelines, why do they not petition to close down the KM pipeline? I wonder how that might affect the economy of the Lower Mainland?

We have seen famous movie stars flying into Washington to protest the Keystone XL pipeline. Do these people not realize that below the city of Los Angeles there is a huge oil field, which is pumping out crude oil from beside schools and other buildings?

In addition, the US west coast imports 1.5 million barrels per day, with 24 per cent coming in by tanker from Saudi Arabia, a distance of 11,400 miles.

Tankers also carry heavy crude from Venezuela to refineries in the Gulf of Mexico, and to Canada’s east coast. It seems that anti-pipeline people prefer oil hauled by tankers and by rail, rather than through pipelines.

Where is the common sense?

And speaking of flying, it seems that a senior Greenpeace executive, Pascal Husting, has been commuting from his home in Luxembourg to his job in Amsterdam by air instead of by train.  This makes a mockery of the Greenpeace campaign to reduce flying.

“Environmentalists” have been very active in Europe protesting proposed oil and gas fracking, including making films. Who is funding and backing most of this campaign? Russia! Primarily the big gas company Gazprom and various Russian politicians.

Is it any coincidence that Gazprom has doubled the price of gas to the Ukraine, and now has cut off all supplies? Russia uses fracking as a part of its industry. Russia also supplies a lot of gas to other European countries, and seems to want to control those countries too, apparently by what some people might call blackmail.

Our anti-pipeline, anti-fracking people seem to be throwing their support behind the Russian dictatorship and encouraging attacks against the Ukraine. And what about North Korea?

North Korea is totally dependent on a pipeline from China for its oil supplies.  Our anti-pipeline people are not opposed to that pipeline. Why not?

The New Democratic Party appears to be taking a leadership role in trashing the oil industry (greedy corporations and capitalists) and proposed pipelines. I would not feel so bad if these anti-pipeline people would act on their beliefs and boycott the products.

They should stop using the products for transportation, energy, cell phones and computers etc. (around 80 per cent of cell phones and computers contain plastics from the oil industry).

This anti-pipeline organization reeks of hypocrisy. I believe it would be appropriate for these people, particularly the NDP, to put up big signs reading “Blockade Alberta.”

Roger Pratt

Nelson

Just Posted

Flying feet at taekwondo tournament

Yom Chi Martial Arts hosted a day of sparring on Saturday

Granite Pointe opens for the season

All 18 holes at the golf course opened Monday

COLUMN: Civic Theatre celebrates the past and targets for the future

See all films in Ingman Bergman’s Trilogy for the price of two

Three Nelson organizations get provincial funding to fight violence against women

The money is part of $6.5 million from the provincial government

COLUMN: Facing the perils of social media

We don’t want to be governed by people with shrinking brains

Toronto van attack suspect faces 10 counts of first-degree murder

The suspect in the Toronto van attack that killed 10 people and injured 15 others on Monday is a 25-year-old man named Alek Minassian

B.C. Hells Angels invited to rally by anti-SOGI organizer

The Culture Guard group has helped Hells Angels in the past, said its executive director.

B.C. bill aims to keep Indigenous kids in communities, out of care

Changes to Child, Family and Community Service Act could connect MCFD, Indigenous communities

Condo contract rules target B.C. property flippers

Regulations to prevent property transfer tax evasion

Turning vehicles into deadly weapons is easy and cheap, expert says

Not all recent vehicle attacks have been linked to terror groups, says Candyce Kelshall

Canada not properly managing fish farms, environment commissioner says

Better standards are in place in British Columbia, meaning less fish have escaped, reports show

B.C. to give municipalities final say over rental zoning

City halls will be required to provide housing needs assessment

B.C. firm linked to Facebook data scandal defends its political work

AggregateIQ says it helps customers craft messages for online political ads, use data for campaigns

Toronto van attack accused was briefly in Canadian Armed Forces

Alek Minassian was a member of the forces from Aug. 23, 2017 until Oct. 25

Most Read