Making sense of Nelson’s KHAOS

It’s not something you expect from small town Canada.

KHAOS will open on March 8.

It’s not something you expect from small town Canada. A major opera — written, composed and starring the talent of a population base not much bigger than a modest neighbourhood in a major population centre.

But this is Nelson.

Next week, KHAOS will take the Capitol Theatre stage for the world premiere of a production more than two years in the making. It’s a massive accomplishment and testament to what an incredble base of talent this community boasts.

Whether you’re a fan of opera or not, next week’s run is something not to be missed. It’s another high historical watermark for this town’s arts community. A feat most from the outside world would have said was impossible. A commissioned opera in a town with just over 10,000 residents?

The doubters don’t know Nelson.

Through the hard work of the volunteer-run Amy Ferguson Institute, it happened. A gala dinner at the Nelson and District Rod and Club helped kick off the fundraising a couple of years ago. A strange, yet somewhat fitting venue to launch the energy for an opera.

Since that point the toil has been extensive by all involved. Composer Don Macdonald and librettist Nicola Harwood have created a piece of work that will showcase incredible talent. That cast will bring the work to life starting next Thursday.

Then of course there are all those working behind the scenes to fundraise, build sets, light the stage and promote the opera. These people do it for the love of theatre and the love of community. Their bows will not happen on stage during opening night, but they all deserve a standing ovation.

Congratulations to all those inovlved in KHAOS. We know it’s going be great and can’t wait for the curtain to rise on a production this community will never forget.

 

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