Making your dollars count

When you read nelsonstar.com this week, news of Our Daily Bread’s financial woes may have come as a surprise.

When you read nelsonstar.com this week, news of Our Daily Bread’s financial woes may have come as a surprise. And when news like this breaks, the public tends to respond.

This was the case late last fall when the Salvation Army declared their cupboards were bare and the food bank shut down. That was until the community came forward as the media shone light on their need.

Directing donations is a tenuous role the media takes on. It seems these days there are many in need. From the Nelson arts and culture community to supporting research into terminal illness to the poor and hungry, even pennies are being requested.

In a small community, the needs of people and organizations around us is magnified, as personal connections exist on a deeper level. It’s easy to see why constant fundraisers can lead to a donation burnout. The wallet can only open so many times despite how much we may want to give.

Where Our Daily Bread sets a good example is that it makes an effort to provide for itself. Through SHARE Nelson, the organization generates about $18,000 annually for its hot meal program. They ask their patrons to pitch in as well by purchasing a punch card to cover 90 cents of a $4 lunch. Neither Our Daily Bread nor their regulars expect 100 per cent charity.

In choosing where your donations go, what do you consider? What makes you feel good, what you philosophically support or is it simply personal connection? In any way, donating shouldn’t be out of guilt rather the complete pleasure of giving.