Learning from Lefty

Learning from Lefty

Former Harlem Globetrotter Harold (Lefty) Williams was in town to run a basketball camp

Harold Williams can stand backwards and drain a basket without looking at will.

But basics come first, and the former Harlem Globetrotter made sure to focus on the fundamentals during a basketball camp Saturday at L.V. Rogers.

“Today we just want to see how well they listen, take instruction and give them all my energy,” said Williams. “I’ve been blessed to do it 12 years professionally and I own my own team called the Harlem Dreams. Just give them as much as I’ve been able to learn.

“It’s all about what was once my ceiling is now their floor. That’s what it’s about.”

Williams dropped into Nelson for the camp ahead of his keynote speech at the Yes2Know Summit in Castlegar on Monday and Tuesday. The Los Angeles resident runs the Dare2Dream Foundation, a youth empowerment organization.

RCMP Cpl. Riorden Bellman, who is helping to organize the Yes2Know event, said he couldn’t resist asking Williams to sneak in a camp for kids from Nelson, Salmo, Trail, Slocan and New Denver.

“I’m hoping that the interest grows,” said Bellman. “What I’m hoping is some of the people who haven’t thought about basketball before actually start to play a bit more, and the ones who are enthusiastic already or even more enthusiastic take it back to their teams, take it back to their school.”

 

Williams and his wife Shyneefa run the Dare2Dream Foundation, which works to raise the quality of life for youth.                                Photo: Tyler Harper

Williams and his wife Shyneefa run the Dare2Dream Foundation, which works to raise the quality of life for youth. Photo: Tyler Harper

Williams was the first left-handed player to sign with the Harlem Globetrotters.                                Photo: Tyler Harper

Williams was the first left-handed player to sign with the Harlem Globetrotters. Photo: Tyler Harper

Spinning a basketball on one finger is just as hard as it looks.                                Photo: Tyler Harper

Spinning a basketball on one finger is just as hard as it looks. Photo: Tyler Harper