Indigenous

Catherine McCarthy-Martin holds a yellow rose in honour of her niece Chantel Moore during a healing gathering at the B.C. legislature in Victoria on Thursday, June 18, 2020. A jury of three women and two men has been chosen in the coroner’s inquest into the death of Chantel Moore — a 26-year-old Indigenous woman fatally shot by police in Edmundston, N.B., during a wellness check on June 4, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Mother of Chantel Moore tells inquest about night N.B. police shot her daughter

Inquest underway into what happened the 2020 night Tla-o-qui-aht mom was shot and killed by police

 

Pictures of Chantel Moore, are held by family and friends during a healing gathering at the B.C. Legislature in Victoria on Thursday, June 18, 2020. The lawyer for the family of Chantel Moore says it’s hoped a coroner’s inquest that starts Monday in Fredericton can determine exactly what happened the day — almost two years ago — the 26-year-old Indigenous woman was shot and killed by police in Edmundston, N.B. during a wellness check.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Inquest to begin in N.B. police shooting of Indigenous woman during wellness check

Chantel Moore had recently moved from B.C. to New Brunswick to be closer to family

 

Horses from the community of Esk’etemc race down the slope in a traditional annual roundup which brings the horses back from winter range to the reserve. (Georgina Chipman photo)

PHOTOS: Indigenous Cariboo horse roundup a time-honoured tradition

Horses returned from winter range in Esk’etemc thanks to leadership of Bill Chelsea

 

Cassidy Caron, president of the Metis National Council, speaks to the media in St. Peter’s Square after a meeting with Pope Francis at the Vatican, Monday, March 28, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Gregorio Borgia

Pope Francis to visit Edmonton, Quebec and Iqaluit in July to meet Indigenous people

Visit comes after apology last month for the Roman Catholic Church’s role in residential schools

Cassidy Caron, president of the Metis National Council, speaks to the media in St. Peter’s Square after a meeting with Pope Francis at the Vatican, Monday, March 28, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Gregorio Borgia
A pod of narwhals surfaces in northern Canada in this August 2005 file photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Inuit hunters fear an upcoming ruling on an Arctic mine expansion could hasten the ongoing decline of a narwhal population that they rely on for food. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Kristin Laidre, NOAA

Inuit fear ruling on Arctic mine expansion could hasten ongoing narwhal decline

Hunters and trappers say mine is already harming their ability to harvest the important food source

A pod of narwhals surfaces in northern Canada in this August 2005 file photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Inuit hunters fear an upcoming ruling on an Arctic mine expansion could hasten the ongoing decline of a narwhal population that they rely on for food. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Kristin Laidre, NOAA
RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki speaks during a news conference in Ottawa, Wednesday October 21, 2020. In a new mandate letter issued to RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki, Mendicino instructs the national police force to proactively disclose documents, help uncover truths and allow for alternative forms of investigation as communities “seek justice at their own pace.”	THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Help heal Indigenous residential school trauma, public safety minister tells RCMP

Force told to proactively disclose documents and allow for alternative forms of investigation

RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki speaks during a news conference in Ottawa, Wednesday October 21, 2020. In a new mandate letter issued to RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki, Mendicino instructs the national police force to proactively disclose documents, help uncover truths and allow for alternative forms of investigation as communities “seek justice at their own pace.”	THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Governor General Mary Simon smiles during a round-table discussion with northern organizations, Monday, May 9, 2022 in Kuujjuaq, Que. Gov. Gen. Mary Simon is beginning her tour of the Nunavik region of northern Quebec today by meeting with local officials, including the Kuujjuaq mayor and council, the Kativik regional government, the school board and the board of health and social services. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

‘Welcome home, Mary’: Gov. Gen. Mary Simon begins tour of Nunavik

‘Mary’s been advocating for Inuit people our entire lives’

Governor General Mary Simon smiles during a round-table discussion with northern organizations, Monday, May 9, 2022 in Kuujjuaq, Que. Gov. Gen. Mary Simon is beginning her tour of the Nunavik region of northern Quebec today by meeting with local officials, including the Kuujjuaq mayor and council, the Kativik regional government, the school board and the board of health and social services. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Award-winning CBC journalist Angela Sterritt (left) will be a mentor for the 2022 Audible Indigenous Writers’ Circle program. Samantha Krilow (right) was a participant in the 2021 program. (Submitted photos)

Applications open for Audible Indigenous Writers’ Circle mentorship program

21 participants will be matched with one of seven mentors in the six-month program

Award-winning CBC journalist Angela Sterritt (left) will be a mentor for the 2022 Audible Indigenous Writers’ Circle program. Samantha Krilow (right) was a participant in the 2021 program. (Submitted photos)
Maxwell Johnson and members of the Heiltsuk Nation gathered outside the BMO on Burrard Street in Vancouver May 5 to announce a settlement has been reached after Johnson and his granddaughter were handcuffed outside the branch two years ago. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)
Maxwell Johnson and members of the Heiltsuk Nation gathered outside the BMO on Burrard Street in Vancouver May 5 to announce a settlement has been reached after Johnson and his granddaughter were handcuffed outside the branch two years ago. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)

Indigenous man, granddaughter handcuffed outside B.C. BMO reach settlement with bank

An apology ceremony will be held in Maxwell Johnson’s home community of Bella Bella

Maxwell Johnson and members of the Heiltsuk Nation gathered outside the BMO on Burrard Street in Vancouver May 5 to announce a settlement has been reached after Johnson and his granddaughter were handcuffed outside the branch two years ago. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)
Maxwell Johnson and members of the Heiltsuk Nation gathered outside the BMO on Burrard Street in Vancouver May 5 to announce a settlement has been reached after Johnson and his granddaughter were handcuffed outside the branch two years ago. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)
Cora Morgan, First Nations family advocate for the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, is shown in Winnipeg on Monday, Feb. 22, 2016. Front-line workers are calling for more support for Indigenous families after a Statistics Canada analysis found First Nations, Inuit and Métis women are more likely to experience physical or sexual assault in their lifetime if they were in government care as children. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

Indigenous women more likely to face violence if they were a child in care: report

Overwhelming majority reported sexual, physical assault at some point in their life

Cora Morgan, First Nations family advocate for the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, is shown in Winnipeg on Monday, Feb. 22, 2016. Front-line workers are calling for more support for Indigenous families after a Statistics Canada analysis found First Nations, Inuit and Métis women are more likely to experience physical or sexual assault in their lifetime if they were in government care as children. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods
Maynard Johnny Jr. looks over the Salish Heron at BC Ferries Fleet Maintenance Unit in Richmond. (Photo by BC Ferries)

Scope of Salish Heron ferry design captivates artist

Seeing the final product for the first time inspiring

Maynard Johnny Jr. looks over the Salish Heron at BC Ferries Fleet Maintenance Unit in Richmond. (Photo by BC Ferries)
Members of the Independent Investigations Office of BC (IIO) talk at the scene of an officer-involved shooting, in Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, April 9, 2015. An Indigenous civilian monitor has been appointed to look over a report by British Columbia’s police watchdog in the RCMP shooting death of a 28-year-old man last year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Chief of B.C. First Nation will look over police watchdog’s report on fatal shooting

Julian Jones killed by officers responding to a report of a woman held against her will near Tofino

Members of the Independent Investigations Office of BC (IIO) talk at the scene of an officer-involved shooting, in Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, April 9, 2015. An Indigenous civilian monitor has been appointed to look over a report by British Columbia’s police watchdog in the RCMP shooting death of a 28-year-old man last year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
WLFN Councillor Chris Wycotte (left) and Chief Willie Sellars said Monday (April 25) they are excited about what the future holds for their community after announcing a proposed agreement-in-principle with the federal government worth $135 million. The settlement is intended to address the loss of WLFN village lands taken from them 160 years ago which now form the city of Williams Lake. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

Williams Lake First Nation to hold referendum on $135 million federal settlement

The deal is compensation for loss of lands that now make up city of Williams Lake

WLFN Councillor Chris Wycotte (left) and Chief Willie Sellars said Monday (April 25) they are excited about what the future holds for their community after announcing a proposed agreement-in-principle with the federal government worth $135 million. The settlement is intended to address the loss of WLFN village lands taken from them 160 years ago which now form the city of Williams Lake. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Nuchatlaht First Nation elder and councillor Archie Little, right, speaks with lawyer Jack Woodward outside B.C. Supreme Court before the start of an Indigenous land title case, in Vancouver, on Monday, March 21, 2022. The lawyer for a B.C. First Nation challenging the province over its land rights says the government’s decision not to adjust its case based on new litigation directives “undermines the process of reconciliation.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

First Nation ‘shocked’ by B.C.’s decision not to amend case based on new policy

“My clients are shocked at this hypocrisy,” said Jack Woodward, who represents the nation

Nuchatlaht First Nation elder and councillor Archie Little, right, speaks with lawyer Jack Woodward outside B.C. Supreme Court before the start of an Indigenous land title case, in Vancouver, on Monday, March 21, 2022. The lawyer for a B.C. First Nation challenging the province over its land rights says the government’s decision not to adjust its case based on new litigation directives “undermines the process of reconciliation.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
David Eby, B.C. Attorney General and Minister Responsible for Housing, speaks during a social housing funding announcement in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, on Wednesday, July 28, 2021. The British Columbia government says it has developed “a new approach to litigation” as part of its process to implement its 2019 legislation adopting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C. prioritizing negotiation over litigation for Indigenous rights

Policy in line with United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples legislation

David Eby, B.C. Attorney General and Minister Responsible for Housing, speaks during a social housing funding announcement in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, on Wednesday, July 28, 2021. The British Columbia government says it has developed “a new approach to litigation” as part of its process to implement its 2019 legislation adopting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
The Hudson’s Bay Company heritage building in Winnipeg is photographed Thursday, April 21, 2022. One of the landmark stores formerly run by the Hudson’s Bay Co. is about to undergo a major transformation in the name of reconciliation with Indigenous people. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

Hudson’s Bay Co. calls donation of Winnipeg building an act of reconciliation

Company set to transfer what was one of its flagship stores to a First Nations group

The Hudson’s Bay Company heritage building in Winnipeg is photographed Thursday, April 21, 2022. One of the landmark stores formerly run by the Hudson’s Bay Co. is about to undergo a major transformation in the name of reconciliation with Indigenous people. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods
Manitoba Métis Federation President David Chartrand stands in St. Peter’s Square as Métis met with Pope Francis at the Vatican on April 21, 2022, in this handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Jordan Meixner - Manitoba Métis Federation

‘He took ownership’: Manitoba Métis meet with Pope Francis at the Vatican

An estimated 150,000 Indigenous children were forced to attend residential schools

Manitoba Métis Federation President David Chartrand stands in St. Peter’s Square as Métis met with Pope Francis at the Vatican on April 21, 2022, in this handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Jordan Meixner - Manitoba Métis Federation
Students Joanne Bob, left, and Yvonne Frenchie receive help with classroom exercises from FEATHERS Society literary program instructor Maureen Robinson on Wednesday, April 20, at the Vancouver Island Conference Centre. (Mandy Moraes/News Bulletin)

B.C.-based literacy program for Indigenous elders looks to expand across Canada

Program provides learning opportunities for elders, including residential school survivors

Students Joanne Bob, left, and Yvonne Frenchie receive help with classroom exercises from FEATHERS Society literary program instructor Maureen Robinson on Wednesday, April 20, at the Vancouver Island Conference Centre. (Mandy Moraes/News Bulletin)
The original school bell sits atop a monument dedicated to the Indian Residential School at George Gordon First Nation on Wednesday April 20, 2022. The first geophysical investigation of the George Gordon Indian Residential School identified 14 possible burial locations. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Michael Bell

‘Just the beginning’: 14 graves found at former residential school in Saskatchewan

George Gordon First Nation recently wrapped up the first phase of its months-long search

The original school bell sits atop a monument dedicated to the Indian Residential School at George Gordon First Nation on Wednesday April 20, 2022. The first geophysical investigation of the George Gordon Indian Residential School identified 14 possible burial locations. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Michael Bell
Wet’suwet’en supporters and Coastal GasLink opponents continue to protest outside the B.C. Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Thursday, February 27, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Ottawa feared repeat of 2020 rail blockades before B.C. pipeline arrests last fall

Notes show federal concerns around construction of the 670-kilometre Coastal GasLink pipeline

Wet’suwet’en supporters and Coastal GasLink opponents continue to protest outside the B.C. Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Thursday, February 27, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito