Place Names

An ad from the Kaslo-Slocan Examiner of May 13

PLACE NAMES: Seaton

Seaton might be the most obscure townsite in the Slocan. You won’t find it mentioned in any history book.

 

This ad for the Sayward townsite appeared in the Nelson Miner on Aug. 12

PLACE NAMES: Sayward

Sayward on Vancouver Island and the former West Kootenay townsite of Sayward were both named after lumber magnate William Parsons Sayward.

 

Two of Sandon’s remaining buildings are seen in the 1960s. The building on the left is now the museum

PLACE NAMES: Sandon, part 2

The earliest reference to the future townsite of Sandon was in a letter by John Morgan Harris, dated May 19, 1892.

 

Sandon is seen sometime following the fire of 1900 that razed the downtown district. This postcard was mailed in 1907. The town was named after prospector John Sandon.

PLACE NAMES: Sandon, part 1

Sandon, the West Kootenay’s greatest ghost town, was named after Sandon Creek, in turn named for prospector John Sandon.

Sandon is seen sometime following the fire of 1900 that razed the downtown district. This postcard was mailed in 1907. The town was named after prospector John Sandon.
This ad appeared in the Vancouver Daily World on March 12

PLACE NAMES: Salmo

Salmo is the Latin form of salmon and takes its name from the Salmon River (now Salmo River) that flows through it.

This ad appeared in the Vancouver Daily World on March 12
The hotel at St. Leon Hot Springs is seen above on a ca. 1950s postcard when Ed Gates operated it as the Gates of St. Leon

PLACE NAMES: St. Leon and Rosebery, revisited

In 1892, prospector Mike Grady found hot springs bubbling out of holes in the rocks two miles up a mountainside from Upper Arrow Lake.

The hotel at St. Leon Hot Springs is seen above on a ca. 1950s postcard when Ed Gates operated it as the Gates of St. Leon
The original Rossland townsite plan

PLACE NAMES: Rossland, Part 2

Last week we saw that Rossland was originally known as Thompson, after Ross Thompson, who pre-empted a homestead on the future city’s site.

The original Rossland townsite plan
Columbia Ave. in Rossland is seen in the 1890s or early 1900s. Although most of these buildings are gone

PLACE NAMES: Rossland, Part 1

The area where Rossland sits was first called kEluwi’sst or kmarkn by the Sinixt First Nation, who knew it as a good area for huckleberries.

Columbia Ave. in Rossland is seen in the 1890s or early 1900s. Although most of these buildings are gone
This ca. 1940s postcard misspelled Rosebery as Roseberry. The boat pictured was also called the Rosebery.

PLACE NAMES: Rosebery and Ross Spur

Rosebery, on Slocan Lake, was originally known as Wilson Creek, the body of water that flows through it.

This ca. 1940s postcard misspelled Rosebery as Roseberry. The boat pictured was also called the Rosebery.
The CPR’s Kootenay Lake Hotel was built at Balfour

PLACE NAMES: Ritaville, Riverside, and Rivervale

Ritaville was only ever mentioned once but it’s notable as one of the few local places named after a woman.

The CPR’s Kootenay Lake Hotel was built at Balfour
Riondel could have

PLACE NAMES: Riondel

The origin of Riondel’s name is no mystery, but its pronunciation has been controversial for generations.

Riondel could have
These bunkhouses are prominent landmarks at Retallack

PLACE NAMES: Retallack

Retallack is another place in the Valley of the Ghosts along Highway 31A between Kaslo and New Denver known by several names.

These bunkhouses are prominent landmarks at Retallack
Renata as seen from Broadwater Road

PLACE NAMES: Remac and Renata

Remac is a compound name taken from the principal locators of the Reeves MacDonald mining properties.

Renata as seen from Broadwater Road
Queens Bay was named by 1889 and presumably honours Queen Victoria.

PLACE NAMES: Queens Bay, Rambler, and Raspberry

According to Kootenay Outlet Reflections, Queens Bay “received its name before 1883, when the Ainsworth Mining Camp opened.”

Queens Bay was named by 1889 and presumably honours Queen Victoria.
Thomas Gregg Procter (1862-1913) bestowed his name on the Kootenay Lake community. He was the first person to buy property there and was involved with two townsite promotions and many other business ventures.

PLACE NAMES: Procter, Part 1

Is it Procter or Proctor? The answer is simple but the explanation is complicated.

Thomas Gregg Procter (1862-1913) bestowed his name on the Kootenay Lake community. He was the first person to buy property there and was involved with two townsite promotions and many other business ventures.
The siding sign remains at Poupore

PLACE NAMES: Poupore, Powder Point, and Power’s Camp

Of the few remaining railway siding signs in this area, Poupore surely ranks as the oddest.

The siding sign remains at Poupore
Poplar Creek was a boom town in 1903-04. There are only a few homes there today.

PLACE NAMES: Poplar and Porcupine

The Lardeau ghost town of Poplar Creek was the site of a short-lived gold rush that began in 1903.

Poplar Creek was a boom town in 1903-04. There are only a few homes there today.
ABOVE: Many businesses have adopted the name Playmor over the years. BELOW: An ad for Playmor Hall from the Nelson Daily News of Aug. 31

PLACE NAMES: Playmor Junction

Playmor Junction, at the intersection of Highway 6 and 3A, is one of the more recent additions to local toponymy, dating to 1968.

ABOVE: Many businesses have adopted the name Playmor over the years. BELOW: An ad for Playmor Hall from the Nelson Daily News of Aug. 31
The Pilot Bay lighthouse

PLACE NAMES: Pilot Bay

When James White of the Geographic Survey of Canada inquired about how Pilot Bay got its name, he received an intriguing reply.

The Pilot Bay lighthouse
The most historic building at Perry Siding is the Threads Guild Hall

PLACE NAMES: Perry Siding

The Slocan Valley community of Perry Siding was likely named for Charles Edward Perry (1843-1906), a civil engineer and land surveyor.

The most historic building at Perry Siding is the Threads Guild Hall