Canadians turned to Google in good times and bad in 2018. (Katya Slepian/Black Press Media)

Humboldt Broncos, cannabis, Fortnite: Here are Canadians’ top Google searches for 2018

When celebrities died or Canada Post went on strike, Canada turned to Google

Why is Canada Post on strike?

Why do dogs eat poop?

How old is Prince Harry?

Those were just some of the top Google searches made by Canadians in 2018.

The tech giant revealed the list of its top searches Wednesday and the results, well, they shouldn’t be surprising.

Following the horrific Saskatchewan hockey bus crash that left 16 dead and almost as many injured, Canadians took to Google to ask about the Humboldt Broncos.

READ MORE: Humboldt Broncos emerge from tragedy

Other major headlines, like the Canada Post strike, cannabis and the Ontario election also made Canadians’ top news searches.

READ MORE: Puff, puff, pass: Cannabis is officially legal across Canada

READ MORE: Canada Post backlog, Greyhound exit creating headaches ahead of the holidays

As far as hockey teams go, we’re not picking favourites but Canadians certainly did: the Winnipeg Jets were the only hockey team to make the list.

Over on the tech side, games made up the majority of the top five searches with Fortnite, Fallout 76 and Red Dead Redemption 2 all making the cut.

Other tech searches included bitcoin and the iPhoneXS.

READ MORE: B.C. Fortnite gamer donates $164,000 in winnings to SPCA

READ MORE: Got $1,100? Apple shows off its most expensive iPhone yet

Demi Lovato topped searches in both the people and the musicians and bands categories while 6ix9ine, a U.S. rapper actually named Daniel Hernandez, rounded out the top five.

He also made an appearance in the questions category with”Why is 6ix9ine going to jail?”

The answer to that question is also on Google: He faces a possible life sentence in federal prison on gang-related racketeering, firearms and drug charges.

When the world lost its stars, Canadians turned to Google.

The searched for famous chef Anthony Bourdain, fashion icon Kate Spade, musicians Mac Miller and Avicci and famed physicist Stephen Hawking.

READ MORE: Celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain found dead at 61


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

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