Leap Day, on Feb. 29, only happens every four years. (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)

Leap Year means we get an extra day in February, so how are you spending it?

People online have a number of suggestions and plans on how they will be spending Saturday

It never seems like there is enough time to get everything done. But this year we get an extra day, so how are you going to spend it?

A Leap Year falls every four years and contains an additional day in order to keep the calendar year synchronized with the Earth’s rotation around the sun. The extra day falls on Feb. 29, while non-Leap Years only include 28 days in February.

Exactly how to use the extra day is a question taking social media by storm and, as always, people have some ideas.

Historically, some people have used the extra 24 hours to reach new records and make headlines. For instance, Gordie Howe used the day in 1980 to become the first NHL player to score 800 career goals. Former Canadian prime minister Pierre Trudeau announced he would be retiring on Leap Day in 1984.

But for the rest of us, the day will likely not involve making history. Instead, a number of outdoor groups suggest walking and exploring the great outdoors.

On the other hand, many social media users have said they plan to sleep and rest. Others are pledging not to be lazy or binge-watch online streaming services, and instead make the 24 hours “meaningful” whether that be to focus on self-care or unplugging from technology.

As for the five million people in the world born on Leap Day, they’ll likely be taking the opportunity to celebrate their birthday, on their actual birth date. That includes Superman, who was born on Feb. 29, according to DC Comics.

Others say they don’t plan on making any plans or commitments until March 1.

How are you going to spend Leap Day?


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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